THE LA ART SHOW 2013

31 01 2013

THE LOS ANGELES ART SHOW AS SEEN BY THE ART CHRONICLE

The LA Art Show was much expected by Artists and Collectors and Art lovers just the same. It was here and it is gone Iphone 420now. I was able to attend for a brief Saturday afternoon – and it was packed! I thought I was in some kind of futuristic Art version of Neiman Marcus … Not that Neiman was ever that packed with visitors. That was the curious part – apparently, the organizers did a wonderful job promoting it.

Most impressive part was the variety of Art and the presence of Chinese Artists and GalleriesLA ART (27). Among the American Galleries, who are always present at every show like ABBY TAYLOR GALLERY (Boston) and LUREI GALLERY (Los Angeles) just to name a couple – the presence of Chinese art galleries was strong both as number of galleries and quality of Art. The Chinese traditional mastery was possibly the most impressive – A wonderdful large-scale portrait of an elderly lady stayed with me long after I left the show. Daniele Sculpture Woman with w cigaretteImpeccable brushstroke – and emotion for detail. For the short time I was able to view the show  – one other thing made an impression on me – very little sculpture. Almost nonexistent. Could it be that this means a Sculpture Art Show is in the making for 2014?  Hmmm – Maybe next ART SHOW  will have a special section exclusively for sculpture – Contemporary and Traditional Figurative…. In any case – LURIE GALLERY had two California Artists, both dramatically different in their sculpture technique – Jon Krawzhyk - contemporary abstract medium, usually  large scale and Daniele Matalon - traditional figurative third to half-life size bronzes. Daniele Matalon’s “Petra” is exquisite, sensual in a contained kind of way, and masterful in its execution. Daniele Matalon is a Sculptor, who started her career in early 2000. ‘Petra’ reminds me of a sculptural version of an Var5gas and Olivia’s glamourous pin-ups. To view the show , for you is a brief video on the Art Chronicle YOUTUBE  channel ( click on the red text to activate the link).  See you soon!

 Yours Truly,

BIG SMILE

 

 

 

Tsvetana Yvanova,

for The Art Chronicle





ALLURE OF ABSTRACTION

9 06 2012

WHAT ‘S IN AN ABSTRACT?

A few months ago I came across a handwritten note by a very good artist, in his eighties – who just happens to like  classical representational art. He not only did not like abstract painting – he disliked it. OK – many people do not like abstractions – but they have the wisdom to say -‘ I don’t understand it’. What is the Artist trying to say?  That is a valid point. You must understand something before you appreciate it or pass an opinion. I personally struggled for a long time because I did not understand Christo. However –  after a few  videos, his  biographical book, and a few other books on his art – I came upon the ‘aha’ moment. I got it! And ever since  that moment a few years back –  I am trying to the best of my abilities to explain  his art to others – to the best of my understanding.  Back to  the old school Artist, who dislikes Abstract art.  So much so, that he had the audacity to cut out an Article form a newspaper, about a celebrated abstract artist Helen Frankenthaler, with a note  addressed to his fellow-artist buddy:  ‘ Hi  John! Here is another example of hoe talentless fraud is accepted as art  and equally kook-y critics!'”. I just happen to know ‘John’,  who knows I love abstract art and just lets me have the  cut outs… The point here is – it is so easy to  dismiss something one does not understand. And  for some – belittling and degrading something they simply cannot   grasp – comes even easier.

But WHY?

Why dismiss something that clearly has values to many – aesthetic value, poetic value,  even monetary value ….. That brings me to  enclosing some reprints from a a well known publication about my favorite  abstract artist – Gerhard Richter – named lately ” The Top Selling Living artist“:  by Wall Street Journal in an  article by Kelly Crow.

About Gerhard Richter’s unrivalled success Mr. Crow adds: “The artist’s ascent is being driven by market demands as much as curatorial merit: Auction houses and museums, eager for new masters to canonize, are showcasing Mr. Richter’s works around the world at an ever-increasing clip. An influx of international collectors and dealers are also seizing the moment to buy or sell his pieces at a profit—including art-world tastemakers such as Russian industrialist Roman Abramovich, French luxury-goods executive Bernard Arnault, dealer Larry Gagosian, Taiwanese ele
ctronics mogul Pierre Chen and New York hedge-fund manager Steven Cohen

Mr. Richter’s work is uniquely suited to the tastes of the current art market. Like Picasso, he paints in a number of different styles—from rainbow-hued abstracts to poignant family portraits—giving collectors plenty of choice. Like Warhol, he is prolific, which ensures a steady volume of his works in the marketplace—yet enough of his works are in museum collections that he has avoided a glut. And ever since the deaths last year of painters Cy Twombly and Lucian Freud, collectors searching for another senior statesman have started giving his work a closer look.

Collectors are paying a particular premium for Mr. Richter’s larger abstracts from the
late 1980s, which have all the visual impact of a work by Francis Bacon or Mr. Rothko, artists whose prices spiked before the recession. These abstracts are also immediately identifiable as being Mr. Richter’s creations, making them easy status symbols. San Francisco dealer Anthony Meier says, “Collectors want an iconic work in a format that everyone recognizes. Monkey see, monkey do”

As Terry Teachout points out in his article “ The Seductive Allure of Abst

raction” :

“Part of what makes this series so fascinating is that Mr. Diebenkorn, who died in 1993, waged a lifelong “battle” with abstraction. He started out as a gifted Abstract Expressionist painter. In 1955 he suddenly embraced representation, turning out dozens of figurative paintings that translate the language of Matisse into a wholly personal, semiabstract style. Then, in the Ocean Park series, he made a decisive return to total abstraction, in the process creating the most original works of his career.

“To chart Mr. Diebenkorn’s stylistic development is to be reminded of the near-overwhelming power of the idea of abstraction in the 20th century. It was even felt by artists who, like Pierre Bonnard and Fairfield Porter, never produced an abstract painting in their lives, but were nonetheless influenced by the way in which practitioners of abstraction created what Mr. Diebenkorn called “invented landscapes,” nonobjective images that evoked the world of tangible reality while steering clear of literal representation.”

“Just as Kandinsky turned his back on figuration, so did the atonal composers of the early 20th century, led by Arnold Schoenberg, abandon tonal harmony, the fundamental ordering principle on which all Western classical music had previously been based. In a tonal composition, harmonic movement is the “plot” that propels the listener through time. Schoenberg, by contrast, sought to express his inmost feelings in a raw, unmediated way instead of using large-scale tonal architecture to shape them into conventionally coherent structures. “One must express oneself! he told Kandinsky in 1911.Express oneself directly! Not one’s taste, or one’s upbringing, or one’s intelligence, knowledge or skill. Not all these acquired characteristics, but that which is inborn, instinctive.”

Whatever causes the Abstract Art to  be in the center of such controversies as despised by some and revered by others  – is certainly not going away. Abstract Art  is here to stay. For those of us – who love Abstract Art – and even paint abstract – this is the good news. For the ones, who have not grown to at least like it – I would say – “Get over it!  Spend more time trying to understand it and less time complaining and maybe you will figure out why abstract art is so timeless…’ For now, my Abstract lovers – let us enjoy Richter’s unlimited imagination, while he keeps being amazed at his  own success….

Yours truly,

 

 Tsvetana Yvanova

 for The Art Chronicle





TURNING DREAMS INTO BRONZE

6 06 2012

 PORTRAIT OF NICK

The story of this portrait is probably most unusual and has more depth  for  me than anyone else.  Our story started officially on June 3d. But it began a year before that. I have no intention of boring you with details of how I met Nick – but the truth is  it was   an accidental unexpected stroke of  simple destiny.  The suddenness, the beauty and the poetry of it –   will stay with me forever.  Instant bond.  He had this inexplicable capacity to bring the best in people.  Our connection ignited into a wonderful exchange of moments where we would literally finish each other’s thoughts.

On our first trip on Roamer III – he  invited me for lunch. Lunch was an hour away by water  from Marina Del Rey to Redondo Beach.  In  a warm California day in June, there is no better place to be than on water off the coast. The ocean  at this time of the year  is dark blue with playful ripples  as far as the eyes can see.  The coolness of the water, maintaining the steady 64 degrees Farenheit  offsets the summer heat. This extravagant gesture was meant to impress me – and that it did ! Magnificent ocean  views aside – on a purely intellectual level, I  always had a fascination of Motor Yachts  as well – their compact design, the aerodynamic grace, with which they are seeming gliding  on the surface, while reaching depths to preserve balance. The  inherent wisdom of their utility, where nothing must be in excess, except quality – the fine balance between necessities and  luxuries. The lack of space was complimented by high quality of craftsmanship and ingenuous design. Like a giant jewelry box  – everything in Roamer  III was well maintained, despite the fact that she was ready to be retired.

I was very new at Yachting – and fascinated immensely – being at awe of the ocean to begin with.  Roamer III was a lady. What a brave adventurer she was – a wanderer.  She could be tosses left and right – but always maintained balance.  (I believe it has a lot to do with technology on board.)  Roamer and I were quickly became best friends.  I loved the way the engine hummed away  – while gliding    through the surface of the water making its way towards the breakers.  I had to learn the terminology – ‘top deck’  ‘starboard’ and ‘port’  – and  at some point I even graduated to navigating it for an hour   in open ocean and was able to dock Roamer back into her slot, without wrecking it !

That particular day – it was a beautiful day in  June  9th  in early 2000  –  on top deck , on our way to Redondo Beach  – I observed him very carefully . It was sheer joy to see Nick navigate or dock his 75 foot ‘Princess’,  with focused and precise movements, that came  so naturally to him.  His profile was so distinctively British and hansome with the unruly long hair and bronzed skin. There was a remarkable unity between the color of his Celtic blue eyes and the color of the Pacific ocean at that moment. I    marveled the moment   –  while he watched me  be enthralled with the school of dolphins, that were  racing  the yacht.  I  wanted to remember this moment forever.  He  looked incredibly content in his reserved quiet kind of  way – given away only by the glimmer in his blue eyes!  I took some photos. This moment – the ocean, with all its blue power ,  the joy  of dancing dolphins,  Nick with  his boundless passion for yachting and me – all in one place  – will stay with me until my last day .

In the summer of 2005, I was getting ready for an art  show and I wanted to make a sculpture portrait of  Nick  as a surprise. The thought stayed with me for a long time. It always takes me a while before I make a decision to sculpt or paint someone close. In spring 2005 I finally started. I decided to  use water based clay, because it allowed me to work faster and achieve a more spontaneous effects.  His long unruly hair was a challenge – but it worked out well. Nick was   a  passionate Contemporary Art Collector with rather avant-guarde  taste and the portrait needed to reflect his persona and his visionary temperament.  There was something inspirational about him, that does not lend itself  to defining in words. I finished the piece on time and was able to cast it on time for the show.  As the show approached – I was  hoping Nick will come. He was out of town – in Cleveland, where he maintained a permanent residence – a place he loved very, very  much and where he spent a great deal of time.

The Art reception and opening were on July 9, 2005.  Attendance was fantastic –  Tony Michaels  piano virtuoso and Carol Chaikin  on trumpet  –  filled the air with  exquisite jazz improvisations;  everyone had a wonderful time. The next two days brought great  sales too.  Reception was at the Balboa Bay Club,  in Newport Beach. Nick did not come. He could not make it –  he sent someone else  instead  as an act of grace. He always used to do this. His impeccable  blue blood manners were his signature. After the show we talked  a  lot. A couple of weeks after the show we were planing to have dinner as soon as he returns from his short trip to London and Bordeaux, France. That was the last time we spoke.

He never  went to France.   Nor  to London that month. He never  even saw his portrait . Things developed with lightning speed. On August 19 – I received a call. Nick had undergone a six hour emergency operation, from which he did not wake up. It had happened the day before.

But the portrait,  remained  as a pure embodiment of that beautiful June afternoon, when  the stars  were aligned and the world was happy – Nick was happy – and I was extatic. He literally changed my perception of life. He brought out the best in me. That moment – I try to capture  in his subtle smile. His  head is tilted, looking down at the rotor handling  with absolute  precision  the   Read the rest of this entry »





TONY CRAGG – ABSTRACT SCULPTOR

10 02 2012

One cannot not notice once in a while a giant  among us. A giant, that is the same height, same stature like everyone of us – only his  mind and his prolific resume make him a giant. Meet Tony Gragg. An unbelievably prolific sculptor – in a class of his own.

Tony Cragg was born in Liverpool, England in 1949. Internationally recognized as one of the leading abstract sculptors of his generation, Cragg has produced a highly influential body of work centered on the manipulation of shapes and surfaces as they relate to the human environment. Using such diverse materials as bronze, glass, and found objects, Cragg has created enigmatic works that meld bio-morphic shapes with otherworldly textures. In 1988, Tony Cragg was awarded the Turner Prize from the Tate Gallery, London, England. Tony Cragg has exhibited in museums throughout the world including The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.; The Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, Texas; the Tate Gallery, London, England; Musee National d’Art Moderne – Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France; Wiener Secession, Vienna, Austria; and Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain.

London Art Award nomination Tony Cragg: ‘I’m not a religious person—I’m an absolute materialist—and for me material is exciting and ultimately sublime. When I’m involved in making sculpture, I’m looking for a system of belief or ethics in the material. I want that material to have a dynamic, to push and move and grow.’

The Telegraph: “His move away from assemblage towards a material freighted with art-historical baggage could well have made Cragg look antediluvian. But as a show at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art reveals, over the last 20 years Cragg not only faced the challenge but revelled in it, making bronzes that weigh many tons, and yet look as though they’d been freed from the laws of gravity and inertia, zigzagging giddily upwards, as vertiginous in their verticality as Brancusi’s Endless Column. In these amazing sculptures Cragg appears at times to be engaging in a private conversation with the great masters of early 20th-century sculpture.”

Cragg: “There is this idea that sculpture is static, or maybe even dead, but I feel absolutely contrary to that. I’m not a religious person—I’m an absolute materialist—and for me material is exciting and ultimately sublime. When I’m involved in making sculpture, I’m looking for a system of belief or ethics in the material. I want that material to have a dynamic, to push and move and grow.

“I also want that to happen over the course of making things, so that as soon as one generation of sculptures has gone up, another generation is coming on and things are growing up around me. That’s how it seems to work for me.”

The Liverpool-born visual artist is currently the director of Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, and has lived in Germany since 1977. He won the Turner prize in 1988, and for his services to art received a CBE in 2002. He also opened a sculpture park in Wuppertal, Germany. All his sculptures are handmade, and he is well-known for scorn of factory-made art; likening non-handmade works to relatives that one has never met.

 View Tiny Craggs work in a Waldfrieden Sculpture Partk in Germany

Tsvetana,

for the ArtChronicle





FINE ART STORIES by TSVETANA

10 02 2012

THE  “CHAOS&TRUTH”  STORY


Wow ! What a title! How did it come to coin this name, someone asked me once…

Here is how this name came to be one of my most cherished paintings….CHAOS & TRUTH. It started one  summer in early 2000. Summers in Southern California can be scorching – especially  for some of us, born in moderate  European continental climate  across the ocean. The trees in my luscious mini forest –  seem to take it better than the patio, which is turning into an oven for many hours   a day.

I had just begun to experiment with large scale abstract painting, as a diversion from the endless and tedious hours of sculpting. In large scale paintings – every layer consumes   a great deal of paint and needs to dry completely before the next layer be applied. So – the more I experimented – the more  time it needed to dry. The temperature is never the same – so all I could control in the process was the time, not the exposure. Eventually, the frames that I especially create for each piece, stays for great periods of time- waiting its turn  to be completed.

In reality – these new large scale  abstract pieces are as much of a creation of the Sun as they were by me. Really! The temperature makes its own changes on that particular layer – sometimes they are spectacular in its effect! Other time – not so much. In these cases – you have to start over form that point on. This is the spontaneous part I like. Constant discovery!

One time – I had imagined a very large, sprawling canvas, that is very gentle at the sale time…I wanted to make a piece that is very large, horizontal, that has this strong, but calming presence. I make my own frames – it is an involved physical, a little tough – but while I am laying out the wood and the fabric – it gives me time to  put even more thought in  the end result. So I built the frame  36″ by 120″ and let is wait. I used a very fine , but strong blend of linen and silk.  I believe in integrity – when you create something – make sure it is genuine to its  core – including the materials. The purity of material is important to me, whether it is sculpture or a painting.

One summer passed – the large frame stayed untouched. The next summer  I did one layer.  Another summer passed. Then – 3 years later – I put it outside, where I usually work under the blue sky – and  I let my imagination free.
Then one afternoon – in 2009 I had this moment of  discovery and innovation. I was ready to do something entirely different from the ZEN SWIRLS I first did   in 2000. And right there , on the  ground – next to the blossoming orange trees –  I started  layering  the spontaneity of many  years of suppressed intentions to complete for this piece.

The more my determination grew – the softer I wanted it to look! Somehow it always takes more effort to make something  that looks effortless…
Like the ancient  hieroglyphs – which express and entire event – not just a single thing! It is almost impossible to register the thoughts that were occupying my mind at that time. At this moment, you may say – this is my own private performance. It is full of emotions, joy, wonder,  discovery, impatience, – it runs the gamut of  human expression. Then you wait a few hours, because the heavy layers need to settle and be protected from everything – from falling orange blossoms petals –to the tiny cute faced lizard, who live under a near  by  decorative rock  to a wanderer squirrel or a cat, who see this is just a part of the yard , only wet and slippery …
If one had a glimpse of the scene, while I was doing this painting    – it would have been quite baffling to the unknowing eye – the scene would have been closer to a dance, than to painting, simply because of scale. And that is maybe the reason why  each of these large scale paintings have so much meaning for me.

In a few hot summer days in 2010 I managed to complete  CHAOS & TRUTH. There was this gentle lace-like effect, when you look from a distance; when you come close to explore in depth  – it transforms itself into an organic  universe with unexpected spatial depth, impossible to describe.  In the end – this canvas is as appealing vertical as it is horizontal.

The truth is – this piece is very dear to  me. It took years to complete. And I fulfilled my goal – to have a complex large scale painting, that changes with the distance it was viewed. And the chaos, that preceded its completion was simply a precursor for a truth, that emerged in the end.

Isn’t that always the case  – Truth always emerged from Chaos.
Chaos always  preceded the Truth.And that is my very own story behind this piece! Hope you enjoy  it!

 

Yours truly, Tsvetana for TheArtcChronicle

PS. The CHAOS & TRUTH is featured in a DVD, which showcases in  videoart  the paintings of  Tsvetana Yvanova. The idea is to find a brand new way to experience the viewing of art  – a very artistic way of viewing . This DVD selection is available for the first time on Amazon.com.





LA ART SHOW IS FINALLY HERE!

7 01 2012

THE LA ART SHOW  HAS A NEW FORMAT!

Seems that the New Year 2012 – The Year of the Dragon – starts off with a splash for the Art world! With new ideas, new shows, new enthusiasm, and a new format for the show! It is actually three shows in one –  read on – and most of all ATTEND!  Seeing the work of so many creative powerhouses can be a very spiritual experience …It is for me!  I remember in past Art  shows – how impressed and moved I was by the transformational power of Art – especially the Los Angeles Company, The LA ArtMAchine-- who channels the talents of  local Graffiti Artists to elevate their ideas to a new plateau.  This transforms lives. ART transforms lives.  Art has the power to save! Better than religion, better than politics and certainly better than wars . Art and Love has always been intertwined in  literature in poetry. It is because it is in the very core of our DNA to create.  Creativity is based on light, truth and has a power, that transforms. You may disagree – but you know I am right. Read on!

…and have  A Happy New 2012 Year!!!!!

David Arquette, The Art of Elysium, the J. Paul Getty Museum Education Department, the Fine Art Dealers Association, the International Fine Print Dealers Association, Los Angeles Art Show LLC., and KR Martindale Show Management cordially invite you to attend the Opening Night Premiere Party of the 2012 Los Angeles Fine Art ShowLA Art Showand the LA IFPDA Fine Print Fair.

Join David Arquette and LA’s top collectors and benefactors for an evening celebrating creativity, diversity, and charity. Enjoy culinary, visual, and cultural delights as well as the unique compelling artistic expressions of Jim Dine, Ed Ruscha, Gorky, Thiebaud, Warhol, Botero, Guy Rose, Picasso, Camille Pissarro, Renoir, and more. Participate in the must-attend event of the year, support the community, and enjoy a magical evening of art.

DON’T FORGET TO ATTEND!!! JANUARY 18 HERE IS THE LINK:

THE LA ART SHOW

HIGHLIGHTS FOR THE 2012 OPENING NIGHT PREMIERE PARTY

An installation by performance artist Mark Mothersbaugh, who will debut a much anticipated artwork combining sculpture and music in an interactive experience.A special re-creation of The Myths of Rape, originally performed in 1977 by Leslie Labowitz-Starus as part of Three Weeks in May. This unique event is part of Three Weeks in January, a new work by Suzanne Lacy presented by LACE as part of Pacific Standard Time.

SL_bwperformance                              LACE logo

CHINA PAVILION: Classic Buddhist Paintings: A Retrospective of Xia Jingshan. This unprecedented exhibit in the US will feature a retrospective of important works by this renowned Chinese master brush painter and will introduce the work of Xia Jingshan’s preeminent student Tong Hongsheng, bringing the voice of the next generation of the master’s Beijing-based school, Xia Xue, to light.

The exhibition will also showcase the re-creation of an elaborate reading room of an antique Qing Dynasty wooden home from Southern China.

HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE!

Yours Truly,

Tsvetana Yvanova,

For TheArtChronicle





BILLY ZANE – The surprise of Bergamont Station

14 09 2010

A Saturday visit to the Bergamont Station galleries was full of surprises. Me and a good friend, made an appearance on all  of the openings that night. The excitement, the buzz was there. Sometimes when expectations are high – impressions are  almost always slightly below. We were zigzagging from gallery to gallery faster than Mao Tse Dung breezed through Versailles . . . .Unril, I discovered Billy Zane exhibit at Laurie Frank Gallery ( Frank Pictures Gallery ). It lacked the hip and stylish arrogance of its neighbors – but it compensated in wonderfully curated Billy Zane show, well under its way. I was surprised both by the name as well as by the quality of his work. Robert Rauschenberg comes to mind. Obviously, Billy Zane’s talents have little boundaries. His work displayed controlled spontaneity and artistic confidence.

Below is their promo for the show.

Frank Pictures Gallery is delighted to present, Killing With Love. Billy Zane’s first show of paintings with an opening reception for the artist. Zane, best known for his achievements as an actor in over 80 films, most memorably as Caledon Hockley in the 1997 film Titanic, began painting during his seven months of filming the blockbuster with James Cameron. It didn’t take long for his interest in painting become more than a pastime, it became a consuming passion, often interrupted by his on set responsibilities. Since then he has set

Frances Fisher, Billy Zane & Friend

up makeshift art studios on almost every location he is filming in, the cultural influences and limitation to local materials influencing his spontaneous abstract offerings. ‘I love the mystery. The joy of making do with what you have to work with. The Hardware store is my art store and most countries, cities and villages have one in some form or another. If I can’t find canvas, I find old signage, shelf liner, or shipping crates. If I can’t find enough paint I use soil, clay, wine, spit, anything that adheres.”

He has been further influenced in his art by his practice of the Japanese sword fighting martial art Kendo. “In Kendo, or Specifically the Samurai ethic and art of swordsmanship, before it was diluted into a sport after WW2, one should not insult their opponent with a mincing, poorly executed cut It should be decisive, effective, a clean kill, informed with respect for ones adversary and ones own skill. In painting, it’s this commitment to task that interests me most, the cut, the stroke. The act supersedes the message. Logic and meaning, if any, emerges after the fact, but is also inherent, like the sculpture in the stone, and only evident when I have been guided by an almost brash confidence. Painting for me, is more physical than psychological or even emotional. Although, I derive great joy from the act and serve an almost insatiable desire to sling paint.”

That maybe so – but many have had the desire to ‘sling’  paint, few have done it well. And Billy Zane does it very well. The FRANKS PICTURES GALLERY is located on the address below:

Bergamot Station Gallery A-5, 2525 Michigan Avenue, Santa Monica California 90404, Tel. 310-828-0211, Fax. 310-828-0221

Moblie. 323-839-6166 .They  are open Tuesday – Saturday from

11:30 am – 6:30 pm or by appointment. Laurie@FrankPicturesGallery.com

They have a New York affiliate gallery – Johnny Wong.
Johnny@FrankPicturesGallery.com

Yours truly, Tsvetana Yvanova





FOR FINE ART PUBLISHERS AND GALLERIES

18 08 2010

Attention: FINE ART PUBLISHERS and GALLERIES


FINE ART PUBLISHERS, who wish to  inquire about reproduction rights of Tsvetana Yvanova’s art – sculptures, digital lithographs, paper prints, giclees, please fill in the contact form online or simply call between 9 am  and 5 pm weekdays to discuss all available options.Specify your field of interest.

FINE ART GALLERIES, who wish to  inquire about representing Tsvetana Yvanova in their  gallery – figurative  sculpture editions, original paintings, limited edition  lithographs, please fill in the contact form online or call between 9 am  and 5 pm weekdays to discuss all available options. Specify your field of interest.

When requesting a  catalog, for the purposes of reproduction – specify  the focus of your interest – Sculpture,  Portraiture, Figurative; Contemporary Paintings, Large Scale Digital Lithographs ( Giclees) or Museum quality Paper Prints.






Meet Alan Bamberger – Art Consultant

17 08 2010

Alan Bamberger -Art Consultant, Advisor, Author

ARTBUSINESS.COM’s site principal, Alan Bamberger, is an art consultant, advisor, author, and independent appraiser specializing in research, appraisal, and all business and market aspects of original works of art, artist manuscript materials, art-related documents, and art reference books. He has been selling art since 1979 and rare and scholarly art reference books since 1982, and has been consulting and appraising for artists, galleries, businesses, organizations and collectors since 1985.

Bamberger has appeared live on CNN’s Daywatch, KTLA’s Making It (Los Angeles), and KRON-TV in San Francisco, and answered art business questions on New York City Cable TV’s Project Art Show. He’s been quoted in numerous media including the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, the International Herald Tribune, Great Britain’s Guardian Unlimited, the Toronto Star, Marketplace (National Public Radio), the Los Angeles Times, New York Newsday, the San Francisco Chronicle, Esquire, ESPN Magazine, Real Simple, ARTnews, The Arizona Republic and Wired and has been featured in the Chicago Tribune, the San Francisco Examiner, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, Your Money, and other publications.

Bamberger has written about the art business since 1983. His syndicated column, “Art Talk,” debuted in 1985 and appeared in antique and collectibles newspapers and magazines nationwide including Antique Week, Mid-Atlantic Antiques Magazine, Yesteryear, Antique and Collectables, The Collector, Antiques and Auction News, Antique Gazette,Old Stuff, and Collectors Journal. Bamberger currently writes the “Turning Pro” column for Coagula Art Journal, has been a columnist for Art Calendar Magazine, and has written numerous articles about the art business for publications like American Artist, Antiques and Fine Art, Antiques West, Antique Trader, San Francisco Review of Books, and Art of California. He has also written three books, Buy Art Smart and Art For All, published by Wallace-Homestead in 1990 and 1994 respectively, and The Art of Buying Art, published by Gordon’s Art Reference in 2002, and then revised and enlarged in 2007.

He consults on legal matters involving art, has given expert testimony in court, done numerous radio interviews, spoken with Spencer Michaels of The News Hour With Jim Lehrer regarding a PBS news story about eBay, consulted with financial columnist Andrew Leckey for annual predictions on what’s hot in the art market, been interviewed by Random House editors for the art section of their book The Practical Guide to Practically Everything, and is a listed expert in Tony Hyman’s Trash or Treasure. He also speaks to museum and collector groups across the country and was the original moderator of the “Topics in Art” forum on the Antique Week website.

Bamberger is a member of the Association of Online Appraisers (of which he has served on the Ethics Committee), the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America and the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers. He has served on the board of directors of Creativity Explored, an organization dedicated to encouraging artistic expression in the developmentally challenged, on the exhibition committee of Visual Aid, a service organization serving artists with life threatening illnesses, and worked with ArtSpan which produces San Francisco Open Studios

I have found Mr. Bamberger’s website to be of incredible value to Independent Artists. His Articles offer a wealth of knowledge and experience.

He may be contacted through his website as well as email: alanb@artbusiness.com

Yours kindly,

Tsvetana

The Art Chronicle Principle





Meet Jeremy Lipking – A True California Talent

28 03 2010

A Note From Jeremy

Dear Friends,

I hope you are enjoying your winter (or summer for my southern hemisphere friends), I know I am. Here in southern California the Winters and Spring are my favorite times to paint outdoors, the hills are green, the streams are full and the temperatures can be in the 70’s and 80’s. I’ve been trying get out there when I can to take advantage of the great conditions. I’ve also been lucky this Winter to have had a chance to paint with some great visiting artists like Christopher Pugliese and Rose Frantzen who currently has an exhibition at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC.
Here are some upcoming events I’d like you to know about.

California Workshops
May and June
In each of these workshops we’ll be painting the figure in the studio and outdoors. Click on the links to register and pay.

May Workshop:
May 14th, 15th & 16th 2010

June Workshop:
June 25th, 26th & 27th 2010

Location: Agoura Hills CA
Cost: $495.

For people in Southern California I also offer a weekly painting class in my studio on Tuesday nights 7-10pm. The cost for 8-weeks is $480. To register or for more info on this or the 3-day workshops contact Danielle or call 818-451-7675
You may also pay online for the weekly class here.

Realist Revolution: Panel Discussion
Contemporary Art: REALIST REVOLUTION and CRITICAL RELEVANCE, Is Main Stream Media Missing an Important Cultural Trend?
Date: 4:00PM Friday April 23rd 2010
Location: Hyatt Regency Reston, VA (Washington D.C area)
Cost: Free (you must reserve tickets though)
I am really excited to announce this panel discussion I’ll be moderating at the 2010 Art of the Portrait Conference in the Washington D.C area next month. We have a top notch panel that will be discussing the current movement in representational art and its place in the contemporary art world.
Panel members are:
Jacob Collins, artist & founder of Grand Central Academy
Alexey Steele, artist and recipient of 2009 Gusi Peace Prize
James Panero, writer and managing editor of The New Criterion
Dr. Vern Swanson, author and expert on Academic and Realist art & Director of the Springville Museum.
This is an important discussion for any artist or collector. Although it is part of the Art of the Portrait Conference agenda, this one event will be open to anyone at no cost but you must reserve tickets by emailing Christine Egnoski at info@portraitsociety.org or call 877-772-4321

Solo Exhibition NY

And Last but not least my Solo Exhibition I have been working on for two years night is opening Thursday night June 10th. 2010 at Arcadia Gallery,
51 Greene Street
New York, NY 10013
212-965-1387
I hope to see you there.

Sincerely,

Jeremy Lipking

http://www.lipking.com





Tsvetana Yvanova Fine Art Videos

15 03 2010

YouTube is a platform like no other

My art  Professor Angelakov  used to say –  you have to be able t create with anything that is available to you – if you have a pencil – use a pencil, you have oils – use oils; if you have nothing else available- paint with your fingers – if you have no canvas – draw on anything that comes to hand . . .’  His wisdom still follows  me.  The message was clear – never be swayed by  limitations – be it of materials or anything else.  Let your creativity flow no matter what. His words have nourished y creativity all these years.

A new medium has been added to my presentation palette – YouTube and Vimeo.  A skeptical attitude at first has prevented me to pay closer attention to  this popular public channel of  information. But as soon as I watched a science lecture from Harvard University about Nano particles and  not long after I discovered the most talented video artists of all time Philip Geist – I was a ‘convert’!

A special regular editorial will be dedicated to my Facebook and YouTube  ‘discoveries’.  It is only fair to say – I  am incredibly pleased to find out that there are so many unbelievably talented Artists out there! Has it not been for these networking platforms – I would have missed out on this knowledge ! I am very pleased  that  I am ‘in’.  My scepticism was a thing of the past – I was ‘converted’. Just like Facebook has modified my perceptions about social networking.

Here is a link to my latest video - I tried to make a bronze figure to dance . . . .You will know if I have succeeded. The music of  Antonio Vivaldi became a perfect background for the dancing ballerina. If you log in to The Dance Lesson – you will have the opportunity  to see the result of the new video – www.youtube.com/stylevieworg.

Enjoy it!

Tsvetana Yvanova  for

Tsvetana Yvanova Fine Art





WILLIAM TURNER GALLERY PRESENTS

5 03 2010

William Turner Gallery Upcoming Exhibitions

MATERIAL MATTERS

Presenting:
JAMES HAYWARD
ANDY MOSES
STEVE VAN NORT
SUZAN WOODRUFF

MARCH 13 – APRIL 17

Reception: March 13, 6:30-8:30

William Turner Gallery

PH: 310-453-0909 F: 310-453-0908 2525 Michigan Ave. E-1, SM, CA 90404





Larry Bell At FRANK LLOYD GALLERY

5 03 2010

Larry Bell – A  Contemporary Master

Upon visiting  the Frank LLoyd Gallery, at The Bergamont Station in Santa Monica  – Larry Bell’s work attracted me with its impeccable execution – and somber colors. The textures of the collages were unique – with this  fine, yet commercial feel to it. There is beauty in   the primal compositions ,  executed in the finest of techniques. Add to the blend metallic paint and  all shades of  the dark palette – and you get the picture. Two words come to mind – refined mysticism. We are left with our imagination – wondering where is Joan now?

Larry Bell’s work emerged in the mid-1960’s, and is often included in major exhibitions of Minimal art. His work was shown in the first exhibit to focus on Minimal art, “Primary Structures”, at the Jewish Museum in 1966. Bell’s work was also included in the seminal Museum of Modern Art exhibit, “The Responsive Eye” in 1965. More recently, Bell’s work was prominently presented in the Museum of Contemporary Art’s show, “A Minimal Future? Art as Object 1958-1968”, and discussed at length in the catalogue essays.
Bell is one of the most prominent and influential artists to have come out of the Los Angeles art scene of the 1960s, first showing at the Huysman Gallery, and then at Ferus. He became associated with the most important movements at the time, such as Light and Space art and what was described as “Finish Fetish” (a term coined by the late critic John Coplans). Bell has continued to investigate the complexities of highly refined surface treatments of glass, as well as large-scale sculptural installations.

Larry Bell was born in Chicago in 1939, and currently resides in Taos, New Mexico. The artist now maintains studios in Taos, New Mexico and Venice, California. Having grown up in the San Fernando Valley, Bell attended Chouinard Art School in Los Angeles from 1957 through 1959, where he was a student of Robert Irwin. He was extraordinarily successful as a young artist, and showed regularly at Pace Gallery in New York between 1965 and 1973. In September of 2005, Pace Wildenstein presented a show of works titled “Larry Bell: The Sixties”.

His work is in public collections throughout the world, including The Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo; Art Institute of Chicago; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Los Angeles County Museum; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge; Museum Ludwig, Cologne; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Tate Gallery, London; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Currently Showing at  Frank LLoyd Gallery,  Bergamont Station Santa Monica,CA Frank Lloyd Galler,2525 Michigan Avenue, B5B, Santa Monica, CA
90404, tel: 310 264-3866, fax: 310 264-3868

info@franklloyd.com






Dave Lefner at Skidmore Contemporary

5 03 2010

Dave Lefner Has Aways Been In  Love With LA

As a native-born Angeleno, artist Dave Lefner has always had a love for the city around him.  His work reflects a nostalgia for its aging, but unique signage, storefronts, and architecture from all Los Angeles areas,  ranging from the Valley to Hollywood, to his current home of Downtown L.A.

For Dave, the beauty of this metropolis, whether it’s found in the extreme shadows cast from a broken neon sign at midday or maybe the intricate web of powerlines crisscrossed overhead, provides the perfect inspiration for his detailed, very limited-edition, reduction linoleum block prints.  Since earning his degree in Art from the California State University at Northridge, he has made it his main goal to try to document the history of LA through its urban landscape to help in the preservation of this city, especially Downtown’s historical core.  Even in his chosen medium of reduction linocuts, he hopes to further his goal of preservation.  Because of the immediacy of today’s world, the labor-intensive, process-oriented technique of block printing is being lost and forgotten in the face of a digital age.  But for Lefner, the beautiful mystery of this process, as the piece slowly reveals itself with each new color, is worth preserving as much as his subject matter, his city- a ciudad of angels. Skidmore Contemporary Art Gallery


is opening for Dave Lefner tomorrow  – City Blocks

Reduction Linocuts, March 6 – 27, 2010,

Opening Reception –  Saturday March 6, 4-6 pm
Bergamot Station,  2525 Michigan Avenue, B5, Santa Monica, CA 90404
1-310-828-5070





The International Sculpture Center Award Winners

19 02 2010

The  ISC 2010 Lifetime Achievement Award Winners
Phillip King and William Tucker to Receive Award

(Hamilton, NJ, USA) The International Sculpture Center (ISC) has announced it’s 2010 Lifetime Achievement Award will be presented to world-renowned British sculptors Phillip King and William Tucker. This year’s recipients will be acknowledged at the ISC’s 2010 Lifetime Achievement Award Gala being held on Friday evening, April 9, 2010 at Chelsea College of Art & Design’s 45 Millbank, London, United Kingdom. This year’s gala dinner will bring together art patrons, collectors, gallery owners, and supporters of the artists as well as sculpture enthusiasts, for cocktails, dinner, and award presentation.  The evening’s speakers include former Lifetime Achievement Award winner Anthony Caro; Peter Murray, Director of Yorkshire Sculpture Park; and Keith Patrick, internationally recognized art critic, curator and editor.  Both Mr. King and Mr. Tucker are confirmed to attend this event. The gala dinner is being held in conjunction with the ISC’s 22nd International Sculpture Conference also being held in London, April 7-9, 2010.

Phillip King and William Tucker are British sculptors who spent
considerable time during the development of their careers in the UK.  Both were educators and are known for their generosity of spirit toward other artists.   Phillip King’s impact on the sculpture community has been recognized in a number of ways including being only the second British artist to have an exhibition at the Forte di Belvedere in Florence.   Tucker is still widely recognized for his earliest contribution to the academic world of sculpture, The Language of Sculpture, a book he published in 1974 and has continued to be recognized for his numerous contributions to sculpture.  Both will be featured in the April 2010 issue of Sculpture magazine.

The International Sculpture Center’s Board of Directors established the Lifetime Achievement Award in 1991 to recognize individual sculptors who have made exemplary contributions to the field of sculpture. Candidates for the award are masters of sculptural processes and techniques who have devoted their careers to the development of a laudable body of work, as well as to the advancement of the sculpture field as a whole. Past recipients include Manuel Neri, Magdalena Abakanowicz, Fletcher Benton, Louise Bourgeois, Sir Anthony Caro, Elizabeth Catlett, John Chamberlain, Eduardo Chillida, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Mark di Suvero, William King, Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, Nam June Paik, Arnaldo Pomodoro, Gio’ Pomodoro, Robert Rauschenberg, George Rickey, George Segal, Kenneth Snelson, and Richard Hunt.

Tickets for the 2010 Lifetime Achievement Award Gala are £250 with tables starting at £5,000.  Table donors of £10,000 and above will receive works of art by the award recipients.  For further information, please contact Dawn Molignano, by calling USA 609.689.1051, extension 308, or via email at dawn@sculpture.org. All proceeds from the Gala benefit the programs and services of the International Sculpture Center.

The International Sculpture Center (ISC) is a member-supported, nonprofit organization founded in 1960 to advance the creation and understanding of sculpture and its unique, vital contribution to society. Members include sculptors, collectors, patrons, architects, developers, journalists, curators, historians, critics, educators, foundries, galleries, and museums-anyone with an interest in and commitment to the field of sculpture. Please visit http://www.sculpture.org.

International Sculpture Center, Publisher of Sculpture magazine,
19 Fairgrounds Rd., Suite B,Hamilton, NJ 08619-3450  USA
TEL 609.689.1051   FAX 609.689.1061  http://www.sculpture.org





How Many Billboards? Art In Stead!

5 02 2010

ART ON THE MOVE?

Billboards? Art In Stead .

MAK Center for Art and Architecture at the Schindler House -835 H. Kings Road, West Hollywood 90069-  http://www.howmanybillboards.org How Many Billboards? Art In Stead is a large-scale urban exhibition on 21 billboards simultaneously throughout Los Angeles. Investigating art as a medium for critical intervention, these billboards highlight the interaction of pop, conceptualism and architecture in Los Angeles since the late 1960s. Artists are Kenneth Anger, Michael Asher, Jennifer Bernstein, Eileen Cowin, Christina Fernandez, Ken Gonzaies-Day, Renee Green, Kira Lynn Harris, John Knight, David Lamelas, Brandon Lattu, DanielJoseph Martinez. Kori Newkirk, Yvonne Rainer, Martha Rosier, Alien Ruppersberg, AilanSekuJa, Susan Silton, Kerry Tribe, James Welling And Lauren Woods.
Ads or Art? January 29, 12pm Metabolic Studio Public Salon Series Farmlab/MetabolicStudi1745 N. Spring Street, Unit 4, Los Angeles 90012 http://www.farmlab.org What is the difference between an advertisement and a piece of art? When does an advertisement become invasive, and what should we look at as we journey around the freeways? Anne Bray, the executive director of LA Freewaves—a nonprofit committed to the presentation of independent, experimental, noncommercial and underrepresented media—will talk about the uses and misuses of media in public spaces in Los Angeles. Log on to www.howmanybillboards.org for up-to-date event and scheduling information.





Joe Goody at GreenfieldSacks Gallery

5 02 2010

Golden Dreams

Exhibition  is  through March 6, 2010 at Greenfield Sacks Gallery, Bergamont Station, Santa Monica.2525 Michigan Ave, B6. 310.264.0640 A remarkably unique image attracted my attention from the invitation. Who exactly is Joe Goode?

Joe Goode (born 1937) born Joseph Goode, is an American Artist. Goode was born in Oklahoma City, OK, and from 1959 to 1961 attended the Chouinard Art Institute in Los Angeles, CA.

Birth of “Pop Art” - Famous for his “Pop Art” milk bottle paintings and cloud imagery, Goode’s first solo show was in San Francisco at James Newman’s Dilexi Gallery in 1962. In the same year his work was included, along with Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, Jim Dine, Phillip Hefferton, Robert Dowd, Edward Ruscha, and Wayne Thiebaud, in the historically important and ground-breaking New Painting of Common Objects, curated by Walter Hopps at the Pasadena Art Museum. This historical exhibition is considered one of the first “Pop Art” exhibitions in America. These artists were part of a movement, Pop Art which shocked America and the art world and changed the art world forever.
In 2004, Joe Goode began work on a group of paintings that re-examined his past work. Each oil painting featured a photograph affixed to the face, which represented every major series he had produced to date. Goode then used a gas torch to burn holes in the completed piece, which when hung, cast haunting shadows on the wall beneath. After a year’s work, this body had grown to around 40 pieces. Tragically, these paintings were never shown, as they were destroyed in a fire in Goode’s  studio in May 2005.
From this fire, Goode created 3 new bodies of work. These series marks important changes in Goode artistic process; using the photograph as a means for making larger paintings, and the last time Goode would use oil paint, and the first time, at age 68, he would use acrylic.

The exhibition “Ashes” at DNJ Gallery in Los Angeles, California, is a culmination of these three projects; “Burn Out!” -photographs of Goode’s studio which was destroyed in the fire, “Study for Lost Paintings” –small scale photographic studies of his last series of paintings before the fire, and “Lost Paintings” -large scale reproductions of his studies topped with layers of paint.
Over the years, Joe Goode has combined various traditional and non-traditional media in the creation of his artwork. He has explored images which project a way of seeing “in and out” and “up and down” as well as things that can be seen through: milk bottles, oceans, waterfalls, clouds and torn skies. While his subject matter has remained relatively consistent over the years, he has revisited each theme using different media, aiding him in finding unique ways in which he continues to work.
Goode continues to paint, photograph and exhibit. He lives and works in Los Angeles, California. His work is currently on view at the Greenfield Sacks Gallery. 1 310 264.0640.. www.greenfieldsacks.com. A must see!





Abby M. Taylor Fine Art Gallery

30 01 2010

Georges Noel at AMT Fine Art

During my visit to the LA ART Show -I  had the opportunity to speak with Abby Taylor of AMTFine Art. I was completely taken by a large contemporary piece – the subtle yet ramatic effect was powerful and the technique was unique! The Artist was Georges Noel.


Georges Noel,
French, b. 1924  “Kagemusha Palimpseste, 1989″
Tempera, 76 11/16 x 76 11/16 inches,  Priced at – $46,000.00.

Q: What do you think of the Los Angeles Art Fair?

Abby M.Taylor: We have been showing at this even for over 15 years – it has been very good for our business.

Q: What is the impact of the financial crisis on the Art Market?

Abby M. Taylor: Perhaps the only noticeable effectof the recession is – that it  separated the  amateurs from the professionals. During the last few years there were a lot of  art dealers came out of all walks of life. The recession weeded most of them. This is good for the ones, who are  dedicated .

Abby M. Taylor Fine Art LLC

Abby M. Taylor Fine Art LLC is dedicated to exceptional American and European paintings, works on paper and sculpture. AMTFINEART is the name the gallery uses on a daily basis. The gallery has an extensive inventory and is renowned for its sculpture department. The strength and uniqueness of the gallery is its diverse inventory. Few galleries can effectively approach handling the cross section of American and European paintings and sculptures from the 19th century forward. Below are the movements within this framework in which the gallery has inventory.

* Hudson River School  * American Academic & Expatriot * Orientalist * American Impressionist * American Modernist * Tonalist  * Abstract Schools * French Impressionist * European Academic * European Impressionist * Symbolist & Pre-Raphaelite * Expressionist * Barbizon * Select Contemporary

Abby M. Taylor-From 1989 to 2006, Abby M. Taylor was a partner of The Greenwich Gallery that dealt in American and European paintings and sculpture. In 2005 she officially founded Abby M. Taylor Sculpture as an independent gallery and today it is still a department within Abby M. Taylor Fine Art LLC. With over seventeen years of experience in dealing art, Abby remains completely committed to her clients. Abby brings an enthusiasm, dedication and conviction about the work that creates a reciprocal commitment from her clients. 43 Greenwich Avenue / Greenwich, CT 06830       T: (203) 622 0906

Jean Arp, French, 1886-1966  “Sculpture concrete (dite “mirr”)” Bronze,  15 x 12 3/8 x 13 ½ inches – www.amtfineart.com








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