THE LA ART SHOW 2013

31 01 2013

THE LOS ANGELES ART SHOW AS SEEN BY THE ART CHRONICLE

The LA Art Show was much expected by Artists and Collectors and Art lovers just the same. It was here and it is gone Iphone 420now. I was able to attend for a brief Saturday afternoon – and it was packed! I thought I was in some kind of futuristic Art version of Neiman Marcus … Not that Neiman was ever that packed with visitors. That was the curious part – apparently, the organizers did a wonderful job promoting it.

Most impressive part was the variety of Art and the presence of Chinese Artists and GalleriesLA ART (27). Among the American Galleries, who are always present at every show like ABBY TAYLOR GALLERY (Boston) and LUREI GALLERY (Los Angeles) just to name a couple – the presence of Chinese art galleries was strong both as number of galleries and quality of Art. The Chinese traditional mastery was possibly the most impressive – A wonderdful large-scale portrait of an elderly lady stayed with me long after I left the show. Daniele Sculpture Woman with w cigaretteImpeccable brushstroke - and emotion for detail. For the short time I was able to view the show  - one other thing made an impression on me – very little sculpture. Almost nonexistent. Could it be that this means a Sculpture Art Show is in the making for 2014?  Hmmm – Maybe next ART SHOW  will have a special section exclusively for sculpture – Contemporary and Traditional Figurative…. In any case – LURIE GALLERY had two California Artists, both dramatically different in their sculpture technique – Jon Krawzhyk - contemporary abstract medium, usually  large scale and Daniele Matalon - traditional figurative third to half-life size bronzes. Daniele Matalon’s “Petra” is exquisite, sensual in a contained kind of way, and masterful in its execution. Daniele Matalon is a Sculptor, who started her career in early 2000. ‘Petra’ reminds me of a sculptural version of an Var5gas and Olivia’s glamourous pin-ups. To view the show , for you is a brief video on the Art Chronicle YOUTUBE  channel ( click on the red text to activate the link).  See you soon!

 Yours Truly,

BIG SMILE

 

 

 

Tsvetana Yvanova,

for The Art Chronicle





WHY I SCULPTED THE PRESIDENT

22 09 2012

THE PRESIDENT’S PORTRAIT FINALLY IN BRONZE!!!

By Tsvetana Yvanova

The story behind this work is long. It started in the spring of 2010.

I was asked often – Why did you sculpt the President?
The main inspiration behind the President’s sculpture portrait are Mr. Obama’s character, individuality and intelligence.
As an Artist – for portraiture, I am attracted to subjects, who posses a unique blend of character features, which are seemingly unrelated, but in reality are deeply interconnected. Mr.Obama’s features are of such nature. His contained radiance, his charisma stems from his deep belief and his deep caring for all Americans, regardless of age, financial status and color. This universal quality comes from the depth of his desire to awake the passion of millions and sparkle a call to action to make a difference –this is what made him inspirational.

When a person with such global vision ignites an idea, which comes from this love and compassion for all people – people follow. He managed to begin restoring the world’s respect and admiration for America – so tarnished during the previous presidency.
The historical fact that Barack Obama is the first black President is indisputable. This fact has a significance within our country and outside its borders. With in the US – it gave hope to all who have given it up – outside the US – his election proved to the world that America has changed and all the
shadows of the dark past were just that – shadows.

On a personal level – I have discovered subtlety in Mr. Obama’s character qualities, which make him more powerful. His kindness, his calm and collected demeanor blends with the resilience and enhances remarkable strength that he possesses. Artistically, I am only interested in the character of a subject, so I can give the sculpture a personal presence . In the case of Mr. Obama – this was not an easy task, since I have never met him in person. When I finished it in clay, one viewer made a remark , I will never forget “ Oh my God – he is ready to talk?”. This gave me the assurance that maybe I have accomplished my goal

That evening it was also the first time anyone would view the President’s Portrait in bronze. For all who viewed it that night, I hope I have created and image of a remarkable man, whose personal presence inspires and at the same time makes us ask ourselves questions. One question comes to mind: How far are we willing to go to make the United States of America the greatest country in the world once again? Are we ready ? Can we do it? We all know the answer.

Yours Truly,

Tsvetana

For The ArChronicle





TURNING DREAMS INTO BRONZE

6 06 2012

 PORTRAIT OF NICK

The story of this portrait is probably most unusual and has more depth  for  me than anyone else.  Our story started officially on June 3d. But it began a year before that. I have no intention of boring you with details of how I met Nick – but the truth is  it was   an accidental unexpected stroke of  simple destiny.  The suddenness, the beauty and the poetry of it -   will stay with me forever.  Instant bond.  He had this inexplicable capacity to bring the best in people.  Our connection ignited into a wonderful exchange of moments where we would literally finish each other’s thoughts.

On our first trip on Roamer III – he  invited me for lunch. Lunch was an hour away by water  from Marina Del Rey to Redondo Beach.  In  a warm California day in June, there is no better place to be than on water off the coast. The ocean  at this time of the year  is dark blue with playful ripples  as far as the eyes can see.  The coolness of the water, maintaining the steady 64 degrees Farenheit  offsets the summer heat. This extravagant gesture was meant to impress me – and that it did ! Magnificent ocean  views aside – on a purely intellectual level, I  always had a fascination of Motor Yachts  as well – their compact design, the aerodynamic grace, with which they are seeming gliding  on the surface, while reaching depths to preserve balance. The  inherent wisdom of their utility, where nothing must be in excess, except quality – the fine balance between necessities and  luxuries. The lack of space was complimented by high quality of craftsmanship and ingenuous design. Like a giant jewelry box  - everything in Roamer  III was well maintained, despite the fact that she was ready to be retired.

I was very new at Yachting – and fascinated immensely – being at awe of the ocean to begin with.  Roamer III was a lady. What a brave adventurer she was – a wanderer.  She could be tosses left and right – but always maintained balance.  (I believe it has a lot to do with technology on board.)  Roamer and I were quickly became best friends.  I loved the way the engine hummed away  – while gliding    through the surface of the water making its way towards the breakers.  I had to learn the terminology – ‘top deck’  ‘starboard’ and ‘port’  – and  at some point I even graduated to navigating it for an hour   in open ocean and was able to dock Roamer back into her slot, without wrecking it !

That particular day – it was a beautiful day in  June  9th  in early 2000  -  on top deck , on our way to Redondo Beach  - I observed him very carefully . It was sheer joy to see Nick navigate or dock his 75 foot ‘Princess’,  with focused and precise movements, that came  so naturally to him.  His profile was so distinctively British and hansome with the unruly long hair and bronzed skin. There was a remarkable unity between the color of his Celtic blue eyes and the color of the Pacific ocean at that moment. I    marveled the moment   -  while he watched me  be enthralled with the school of dolphins, that were  racing  the yacht.  I  wanted to remember this moment forever.  He  looked incredibly content in his reserved quiet kind of  way – given away only by the glimmer in his blue eyes!  I took some photos. This moment – the ocean, with all its blue power ,  the joy  of dancing dolphins,  Nick with  his boundless passion for yachting and me – all in one place  - will stay with me until my last day .

In the summer of 2005, I was getting ready for an art  show and I wanted to make a sculpture portrait of  Nick  as a surprise. The thought stayed with me for a long time. It always takes me a while before I make a decision to sculpt or paint someone close. In spring 2005 I finally started. I decided to  use water based clay, because it allowed me to work faster and achieve a more spontaneous effects.  His long unruly hair was a challenge – but it worked out well. Nick was   a  passionate Contemporary Art Collector with rather avant-guarde  taste and the portrait needed to reflect his persona and his visionary temperament.  There was something inspirational about him, that does not lend itself  to defining in words. I finished the piece on time and was able to cast it on time for the show.  As the show approached – I was  hoping Nick will come. He was out of town – in Cleveland, where he maintained a permanent residence – a place he loved very, very  much and where he spent a great deal of time.

The Art reception and opening were on July 9, 2005.  Attendance was fantastic –  Tony Michaels  piano virtuoso and Carol Chaikin  on trumpet  -  filled the air with  exquisite jazz improvisations;  everyone had a wonderful time. The next two days brought great  sales too.  Reception was at the Balboa Bay Club,  in Newport Beach. Nick did not come. He could not make it -  he sent someone else  instead  as an act of grace. He always used to do this. His impeccable  blue blood manners were his signature. After the show we talked  a  lot. A couple of weeks after the show we were planing to have dinner as soon as he returns from his short trip to London and Bordeaux, France. That was the last time we spoke.

He never  went to France.   Nor  to London that month. He never  even saw his portrait . Things developed with lightning speed. On August 19 – I received a call. Nick had undergone a six hour emergency operation, from which he did not wake up. It had happened the day before.

But the portrait,  remained  as a pure embodiment of that beautiful June afternoon, when  the stars  were aligned and the world was happy – Nick was happy – and I was extatic. He literally changed my perception of life. He brought out the best in me. That moment – I try to capture  in his subtle smile. His  head is tilted, looking down at the rotor handling  with absolute  precision  the   Read the rest of this entry »





TONY CRAGG – ABSTRACT SCULPTOR

10 02 2012

One cannot not notice once in a while a giant  among us. A giant, that is the same height, same stature like everyone of us – only his  mind and his prolific resume make him a giant. Meet Tony Gragg. An unbelievably prolific sculptor – in a class of his own.

Tony Cragg was born in Liverpool, England in 1949. Internationally recognized as one of the leading abstract sculptors of his generation, Cragg has produced a highly influential body of work centered on the manipulation of shapes and surfaces as they relate to the human environment. Using such diverse materials as bronze, glass, and found objects, Cragg has created enigmatic works that meld bio-morphic shapes with otherworldly textures. In 1988, Tony Cragg was awarded the Turner Prize from the Tate Gallery, London, England. Tony Cragg has exhibited in museums throughout the world including The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.; The Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, Texas; the Tate Gallery, London, England; Musee National d’Art Moderne – Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France; Wiener Secession, Vienna, Austria; and Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain.

London Art Award nomination Tony Cragg: ‘I’m not a religious person—I’m an absolute materialist—and for me material is exciting and ultimately sublime. When I’m involved in making sculpture, I’m looking for a system of belief or ethics in the material. I want that material to have a dynamic, to push and move and grow.’

The Telegraph: “His move away from assemblage towards a material freighted with art-historical baggage could well have made Cragg look antediluvian. But as a show at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art reveals, over the last 20 years Cragg not only faced the challenge but revelled in it, making bronzes that weigh many tons, and yet look as though they’d been freed from the laws of gravity and inertia, zigzagging giddily upwards, as vertiginous in their verticality as Brancusi’s Endless Column. In these amazing sculptures Cragg appears at times to be engaging in a private conversation with the great masters of early 20th-century sculpture.”

Cragg: “There is this idea that sculpture is static, or maybe even dead, but I feel absolutely contrary to that. I’m not a religious person—I’m an absolute materialist—and for me material is exciting and ultimately sublime. When I’m involved in making sculpture, I’m looking for a system of belief or ethics in the material. I want that material to have a dynamic, to push and move and grow.

“I also want that to happen over the course of making things, so that as soon as one generation of sculptures has gone up, another generation is coming on and things are growing up around me. That’s how it seems to work for me.”

The Liverpool-born visual artist is currently the director of Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, and has lived in Germany since 1977. He won the Turner prize in 1988, and for his services to art received a CBE in 2002. He also opened a sculpture park in Wuppertal, Germany. All his sculptures are handmade, and he is well-known for scorn of factory-made art; likening non-handmade works to relatives that one has never met.

 View Tiny Craggs work in a Waldfrieden Sculpture Partk in Germany

Tsvetana,

for the ArtChronicle





FINE ART STORIES by TSVETANA

10 02 2012

THE  “CHAOS&TRUTH”  STORY


Wow ! What a title! How did it come to coin this name, someone asked me once…

Here is how this name came to be one of my most cherished paintings….CHAOS & TRUTH. It started one  summer in early 2000. Summers in Southern California can be scorching – especially  for some of us, born in moderate  European continental climate  across the ocean. The trees in my luscious mini forest -  seem to take it better than the patio, which is turning into an oven for many hours   a day.

I had just begun to experiment with large scale abstract painting, as a diversion from the endless and tedious hours of sculpting. In large scale paintings – every layer consumes   a great deal of paint and needs to dry completely before the next layer be applied. So – the more I experimented – the more  time it needed to dry. The temperature is never the same – so all I could control in the process was the time, not the exposure. Eventually, the frames that I especially create for each piece, stays for great periods of time- waiting its turn  to be completed.

In reality – these new large scale  abstract pieces are as much of a creation of the Sun as they were by me. Really! The temperature makes its own changes on that particular layer – sometimes they are spectacular in its effect! Other time – not so much. In these cases – you have to start over form that point on. This is the spontaneous part I like. Constant discovery!

One time – I had imagined a very large, sprawling canvas, that is very gentle at the sale time…I wanted to make a piece that is very large, horizontal, that has this strong, but calming presence. I make my own frames – it is an involved physical, a little tough – but while I am laying out the wood and the fabric – it gives me time to  put even more thought in  the end result. So I built the frame  36″ by 120″ and let is wait. I used a very fine , but strong blend of linen and silk.  I believe in integrity – when you create something – make sure it is genuine to its  core – including the materials. The purity of material is important to me, whether it is sculpture or a painting.

One summer passed – the large frame stayed untouched. The next summer  I did one layer.  Another summer passed. Then – 3 years later – I put it outside, where I usually work under the blue sky – and  I let my imagination free.
Then one afternoon – in 2009 I had this moment of  discovery and innovation. I was ready to do something entirely different from the ZEN SWIRLS I first did   in 2000. And right there , on the  ground – next to the blossoming orange trees -  I started  layering  the spontaneity of many  years of suppressed intentions to complete for this piece.

The more my determination grew – the softer I wanted it to look! Somehow it always takes more effort to make something  that looks effortless…
Like the ancient  hieroglyphs – which express and entire event – not just a single thing! It is almost impossible to register the thoughts that were occupying my mind at that time. At this moment, you may say – this is my own private performance. It is full of emotions, joy, wonder,  discovery, impatience, – it runs the gamut of  human expression. Then you wait a few hours, because the heavy layers need to settle and be protected from everything – from falling orange blossoms petals –to the tiny cute faced lizard, who live under a near  by  decorative rock  to a wanderer squirrel or a cat, who see this is just a part of the yard , only wet and slippery …
If one had a glimpse of the scene, while I was doing this painting    – it would have been quite baffling to the unknowing eye – the scene would have been closer to a dance, than to painting, simply because of scale. And that is maybe the reason why  each of these large scale paintings have so much meaning for me.

In a few hot summer days in 2010 I managed to complete  CHAOS & TRUTH. There was this gentle lace-like effect, when you look from a distance; when you come close to explore in depth  – it transforms itself into an organic  universe with unexpected spatial depth, impossible to describe.  In the end – this canvas is as appealing vertical as it is horizontal.

The truth is – this piece is very dear to  me. It took years to complete. And I fulfilled my goal – to have a complex large scale painting, that changes with the distance it was viewed. And the chaos, that preceded its completion was simply a precursor for a truth, that emerged in the end.

Isn’t that always the case  – Truth always emerged from Chaos.
Chaos always  preceded the Truth.And that is my very own story behind this piece! Hope you enjoy  it!

 

Yours truly, Tsvetana for TheArtcChronicle

PS. The CHAOS & TRUTH is featured in a DVD, which showcases in  videoart  the paintings of  Tsvetana Yvanova. The idea is to find a brand new way to experience the viewing of art  – a very artistic way of viewing . This DVD selection is available for the first time on Amazon.com.





LA ART SHOW IS FINALLY HERE!

7 01 2012

THE LA ART SHOW  HAS A NEW FORMAT!

Seems that the New Year 2012 – The Year of the Dragon – starts off with a splash for the Art world! With new ideas, new shows, new enthusiasm, and a new format for the show! It is actually three shows in one -  read on – and most of all ATTEND!  Seeing the work of so many creative powerhouses can be a very spiritual experience …It is for me!  I remember in past Art  shows – how impressed and moved I was by the transformational power of Art – especially the Los Angeles Company, The LA ArtMAchine-- who channels the talents of  local Graffiti Artists to elevate their ideas to a new plateau.  This transforms lives. ART transforms lives.  Art has the power to save! Better than religion, better than politics and certainly better than wars . Art and Love has always been intertwined in  literature in poetry. It is because it is in the very core of our DNA to create.  Creativity is based on light, truth and has a power, that transforms. You may disagree – but you know I am right. Read on!

…and have  A Happy New 2012 Year!!!!!

David Arquette, The Art of Elysium, the J. Paul Getty Museum Education Department, the Fine Art Dealers Association, the International Fine Print Dealers Association, Los Angeles Art Show LLC., and KR Martindale Show Management cordially invite you to attend the Opening Night Premiere Party of the 2012 Los Angeles Fine Art ShowLA Art Showand the LA IFPDA Fine Print Fair.

Join David Arquette and LA’s top collectors and benefactors for an evening celebrating creativity, diversity, and charity. Enjoy culinary, visual, and cultural delights as well as the unique compelling artistic expressions of Jim Dine, Ed Ruscha, Gorky, Thiebaud, Warhol, Botero, Guy Rose, Picasso, Camille Pissarro, Renoir, and more. Participate in the must-attend event of the year, support the community, and enjoy a magical evening of art.

DON’T FORGET TO ATTEND!!! JANUARY 18 HERE IS THE LINK:

THE LA ART SHOW

HIGHLIGHTS FOR THE 2012 OPENING NIGHT PREMIERE PARTY

An installation by performance artist Mark Mothersbaugh, who will debut a much anticipated artwork combining sculpture and music in an interactive experience.A special re-creation of The Myths of Rape, originally performed in 1977 by Leslie Labowitz-Starus as part of Three Weeks in May. This unique event is part of Three Weeks in January, a new work by Suzanne Lacy presented by LACE as part of Pacific Standard Time.

SL_bwperformance                              LACE logo

CHINA PAVILION: Classic Buddhist Paintings: A Retrospective of Xia Jingshan. This unprecedented exhibit in the US will feature a retrospective of important works by this renowned Chinese master brush painter and will introduce the work of Xia Jingshan’s preeminent student Tong Hongsheng, bringing the voice of the next generation of the master’s Beijing-based school, Xia Xue, to light.

The exhibition will also showcase the re-creation of an elaborate reading room of an antique Qing Dynasty wooden home from Southern China.

HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE!

Yours Truly,

Tsvetana Yvanova,

For TheArtChronicle





Kristan Marvel Bronzes at Warner Center

20 07 2011

THE ART ART PROJECT with Curator Jeff Phillips

is presenting Kristan Marvel in  CONTEMPORARY BRONZE  show.

“CONTEMPORARY BRONZE”
July 15, 2011 – September 15, 2011
marvellpiece.jpg

Kristan Marvell
Opening Reception
July 30th, 2011   5-8pm

SCULPTURE @ THE PLAZA GARDENS

WARNER CENTER
21st Century Plaza
6301 Owensmouth Ave
Woodland Hills, CA 91367

THE ART OF KRISTAN MARVELL

Kristan Marvel’ s sculptures derive from a technique, which he developed and has worked with over the last twenty years, that he calls spontaneous carving. His  bronze sculptures begin as monolithic chunks of Styrofoam. As a stone carver has marble, Marvell has Styrofoam. The sculptures evolve as Marvell pulls and  manipulates large hot wires through massive blocks of Styrofoam. This process   allows for the improvisational removal of material and produces a unique visual    vocabulary. Also, Styrofoam, a material devoid of sensuality, an industrial    emblem, is in a sense corrected and made sensual as it progresses towards its  transformation into bronze.
Through this visual vocabulary Marvell explores the confrontation between the  natural, the organic, and man’s manipulation and reconstruction of the world.
On the most obvious level, the natural landscape is used as a point of inspiration, a visual ode to the raw power of its geological beauty. The work acknowledges and utilizes nature’s ability to elicit emotional transcendence. However, the sculptures are not replicas of natural formations. As a sculptor, Marvell, is interested in thematic or formalist concepts such as the relationship between mass and density, or volume and spatial balance. He likes the enigma of creating sculptures where mass is levitated in unusual ways, where unwary fragility is able to bear great weight. By way of modernist formal concerns the work references the concept of man’s transformation of nature through the intellectual event of manipulation.
As the eye wanders the sculptural planes, there is a sparseness, a focused control of surface and texture, in which the hand of the artist is evident. In that organization of space, a thoughtful and heart felt integrity emerges, imbuing the sculptures with emotion and grace, reaffirming the power of the object.

by Nicholette Kominos

For  The Art Chronicle





LONDON-CASS FOUNDATION SCULPTURE PLANS 2012

21 10 2010

LONDON. Exhibition Road, home to the South Kensington museums, is to be lined with ten new and recent sculptures by UK artist Tony Cragg during the 2012 summer Paralympic Games.

The scheme to take over the pedestrianised thoroughfare is led by the Cass Sculpture Foundation, a charitable trust that commissions and sells monumental work on display at its 26-acre estate at Goodwood, near Brighton.
“As a partner of the Cultural Olympiad, we have been working on the Exhibition Road project for the past two years with the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea,” says entrepreneur and philanthropist Wilfred Cass, who established the foundation in 1992. ( Right, Photo of Tony Cragg, Sculptor-www.tony-cragg.com. View a video of on Cragg’s work, click here.)

In another significant move, culture minister Ed Vaizey has expressed interest in the unique funding model of the foundation. Ahead of the 20 October comprehensive spending review, the politician was no doubt keen to discover how the organisation has survived without receiving any funding from state-backed bodies such as Arts Council England.
“The charity’s simple business model effectively means that no outside funding is necessary,” says Cass. “The overheads of the foundation are paid for in full by admission charges and events.” Ed Wilde, technical director at the foundation, says: “When a piece by a particular artist is sold, we will commission another work from them using the foundation’s half of the proceeds. This effectively means that the artists will benefit from 100% of the net profit of a sale, even though the contractual fee is 50/50.”

The sculpture park attracts about 18,000 visitors a year, who pay £10 each to enter. Major sales recently have been to foreign collectors such as Portuguese billionaire José Berardo.

“People find it difficult to understand that a charity can also be commercial but isn’t this the kind of scheme favoured by the current government? With institutions such as the arts council and museums throughout the country facing major cuts, we see our role as working more closely with these bodies,” adds Cass.

 

 

 

VITAL FACTS ABOUT THE CASS SCULPTURE FOUNDATION

The Cass Sculpture Foundation has won a broad international reputation by carefully honing its expertise in the commissioning and sale of large-scale sculpture from the finest British artists.

Profits from all sales are split equally between the artist and the foundation to date we have displayed over 440 new sculptures and have provided an internationally renowned platform for a significant number of British sculptors.
We are now extending our visibility and international profile by planning a major series of events outside of Goodwood.

 

 

Tsvetana Yvanova

Editor,The Art Chronicle





LONDON-FRIEZE ART FAIR BRIEF REPORT

21 10 2010

Big bold art -  sober prices

By Georgina Adam, Charlotte Burns and Melanie Gerlis

LONDON. Dealers were delighted to see hedge-fund honcho Steven Cohen, one of the world’s biggest art buyers, at the preview of Frieze yesterday morning. “It’s my first visit to the fair,” Cohen said as he viewed the work accompanied by his adviser, Sandy Heller.

But Cohen wasn’t the first in. At the front of the line were Dallas collectors Christen and Derek Wilson. “This is my favourite fair,” said Christen, a member of Tate’s North American acquisitions committee. British collectors Frank and Cheryl Cohen sauntered past Tate supremo Sir Nicholas Serota, who was deep in conversation with über-collector Charles Saatchi outside Sadie Coles HQ (C15). Adding serious glamour, Russian collector Dasha Zhukova swished towards Marian Goodman (F16), while supermodel Claudia Schiffer eyed up Thanksgiving 1985 (Table) by hot US artist Roe Ethridge at Andrew Kreps (A7).

Fellow stars included rock’n’roller Keith Richards, photographer David Bailey and an assortment of artists: Ai Weiwei, a wheelchair-bound Tracey Emin, Gavin Turk and Mike Nelson. Early-bird collectors also included Chicago’s Stefan Edlis with Gail Leeson, Hong Kong’s Richard Chang and Brazil’s Ricard Akagawa.

Greeting them were dealers on stands that boasted bigger and bolder displays than in the last two downturn years. Not to be outdone by the usual powerhouses of Gagosian (D8), White Cube (F15), Hauser & Wirth (C12) et al, most galleries this year are ratcheting up their ambitions with larger pieces.
So why is big back? Dealers claim they aren’t driving the trend: “It’s not my ego,” said New York gallerist Friedrich Petzel (D3). “Artists are producing bigger works.” His sales included a large-scale John Stezaker—Untitled (Veil Tiger), 1982—for around £50,000 to a European buyer.

“There are a lot of ambitious collectors still out there,” says James Lindon, visiting the fair from New York’s Pace. He added: “Dealers might be slimming down in terms of production, but that doesn’t impact scale.” In line with today’s more sober mood, many of the materials used are humble: cardboard, paper, flags or found objects.

READ ON …….

 

Tsvetana Yvanova,The Art Chronicle





BILLY ZANE – The surprise of Bergamont Station

14 09 2010

A Saturday visit to the Bergamont Station galleries was full of surprises. Me and a good friend, made an appearance on all  of the openings that night. The excitement, the buzz was there. Sometimes when expectations are high – impressions are  almost always slightly below. We were zigzagging from gallery to gallery faster than Mao Tse Dung breezed through Versailles . . . .Unril, I discovered Billy Zane exhibit at Laurie Frank Gallery ( Frank Pictures Gallery ). It lacked the hip and stylish arrogance of its neighbors – but it compensated in wonderfully curated Billy Zane show, well under its way. I was surprised both by the name as well as by the quality of his work. Robert Rauschenberg comes to mind. Obviously, Billy Zane’s talents have little boundaries. His work displayed controlled spontaneity and artistic confidence.

Below is their promo for the show.

Frank Pictures Gallery is delighted to present, Killing With Love. Billy Zane’s first show of paintings with an opening reception for the artist. Zane, best known for his achievements as an actor in over 80 films, most memorably as Caledon Hockley in the 1997 film Titanic, began painting during his seven months of filming the blockbuster with James Cameron. It didn’t take long for his interest in painting become more than a pastime, it became a consuming passion, often interrupted by his on set responsibilities. Since then he has set

Frances Fisher, Billy Zane & Friend

up makeshift art studios on almost every location he is filming in, the cultural influences and limitation to local materials influencing his spontaneous abstract offerings. ‘I love the mystery. The joy of making do with what you have to work with. The Hardware store is my art store and most countries, cities and villages have one in some form or another. If I can’t find canvas, I find old signage, shelf liner, or shipping crates. If I can’t find enough paint I use soil, clay, wine, spit, anything that adheres.”

He has been further influenced in his art by his practice of the Japanese sword fighting martial art Kendo. “In Kendo, or Specifically the Samurai ethic and art of swordsmanship, before it was diluted into a sport after WW2, one should not insult their opponent with a mincing, poorly executed cut It should be decisive, effective, a clean kill, informed with respect for ones adversary and ones own skill. In painting, it’s this commitment to task that interests me most, the cut, the stroke. The act supersedes the message. Logic and meaning, if any, emerges after the fact, but is also inherent, like the sculpture in the stone, and only evident when I have been guided by an almost brash confidence. Painting for me, is more physical than psychological or even emotional. Although, I derive great joy from the act and serve an almost insatiable desire to sling paint.”

That maybe so – but many have had the desire to ‘sling’  paint, few have done it well. And Billy Zane does it very well. The FRANKS PICTURES GALLERY is located on the address below:

Bergamot Station Gallery A-5, 2525 Michigan Avenue, Santa Monica California 90404, Tel. 310-828-0211, Fax. 310-828-0221

Moblie. 323-839-6166 .They  are open Tuesday – Saturday from

11:30 am – 6:30 pm or by appointment. Laurie@FrankPicturesGallery.com

They have a New York affiliate gallery – Johnny Wong.
Johnny@FrankPicturesGallery.com

Yours truly, Tsvetana Yvanova





Meet Jeremy Lipking – A True California Talent

28 03 2010

A Note From Jeremy

Dear Friends,

I hope you are enjoying your winter (or summer for my southern hemisphere friends), I know I am. Here in southern California the Winters and Spring are my favorite times to paint outdoors, the hills are green, the streams are full and the temperatures can be in the 70′s and 80′s. I’ve been trying get out there when I can to take advantage of the great conditions. I’ve also been lucky this Winter to have had a chance to paint with some great visiting artists like Christopher Pugliese and Rose Frantzen who currently has an exhibition at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC.
Here are some upcoming events I’d like you to know about.

California Workshops
May and June
In each of these workshops we’ll be painting the figure in the studio and outdoors. Click on the links to register and pay.

May Workshop:
May 14th, 15th & 16th 2010

June Workshop:
June 25th, 26th & 27th 2010

Location: Agoura Hills CA
Cost: $495.

For people in Southern California I also offer a weekly painting class in my studio on Tuesday nights 7-10pm. The cost for 8-weeks is $480. To register or for more info on this or the 3-day workshops contact Danielle or call 818-451-7675
You may also pay online for the weekly class here.

Realist Revolution: Panel Discussion
Contemporary Art: REALIST REVOLUTION and CRITICAL RELEVANCE, Is Main Stream Media Missing an Important Cultural Trend?
Date: 4:00PM Friday April 23rd 2010
Location: Hyatt Regency Reston, VA (Washington D.C area)
Cost: Free (you must reserve tickets though)
I am really excited to announce this panel discussion I’ll be moderating at the 2010 Art of the Portrait Conference in the Washington D.C area next month. We have a top notch panel that will be discussing the current movement in representational art and its place in the contemporary art world.
Panel members are:
Jacob Collins, artist & founder of Grand Central Academy
Alexey Steele, artist and recipient of 2009 Gusi Peace Prize
James Panero, writer and managing editor of The New Criterion
Dr. Vern Swanson, author and expert on Academic and Realist art & Director of the Springville Museum.
This is an important discussion for any artist or collector. Although it is part of the Art of the Portrait Conference agenda, this one event will be open to anyone at no cost but you must reserve tickets by emailing Christine Egnoski at info@portraitsociety.org or call 877-772-4321

Solo Exhibition NY

And Last but not least my Solo Exhibition I have been working on for two years night is opening Thursday night June 10th. 2010 at Arcadia Gallery,
51 Greene Street
New York, NY 10013
212-965-1387
I hope to see you there.

Sincerely,

Jeremy Lipking

http://www.lipking.com





Larry Bell At FRANK LLOYD GALLERY

5 03 2010

Larry Bell – A  Contemporary Master

Upon visiting  the Frank LLoyd Gallery, at The Bergamont Station in Santa Monica  – Larry Bell’s work attracted me with its impeccable execution – and somber colors. The textures of the collages were unique – with this  fine, yet commercial feel to it. There is beauty in   the primal compositions ,  executed in the finest of techniques. Add to the blend metallic paint and  all shades of  the dark palette – and you get the picture. Two words come to mind – refined mysticism. We are left with our imagination – wondering where is Joan now?

Larry Bell’s work emerged in the mid-1960’s, and is often included in major exhibitions of Minimal art. His work was shown in the first exhibit to focus on Minimal art, “Primary Structures”, at the Jewish Museum in 1966. Bell’s work was also included in the seminal Museum of Modern Art exhibit, “The Responsive Eye” in 1965. More recently, Bell’s work was prominently presented in the Museum of Contemporary Art’s show, “A Minimal Future? Art as Object 1958-1968”, and discussed at length in the catalogue essays.
Bell is one of the most prominent and influential artists to have come out of the Los Angeles art scene of the 1960s, first showing at the Huysman Gallery, and then at Ferus. He became associated with the most important movements at the time, such as Light and Space art and what was described as “Finish Fetish” (a term coined by the late critic John Coplans). Bell has continued to investigate the complexities of highly refined surface treatments of glass, as well as large-scale sculptural installations.

Larry Bell was born in Chicago in 1939, and currently resides in Taos, New Mexico. The artist now maintains studios in Taos, New Mexico and Venice, California. Having grown up in the San Fernando Valley, Bell attended Chouinard Art School in Los Angeles from 1957 through 1959, where he was a student of Robert Irwin. He was extraordinarily successful as a young artist, and showed regularly at Pace Gallery in New York between 1965 and 1973. In September of 2005, Pace Wildenstein presented a show of works titled “Larry Bell: The Sixties”.

His work is in public collections throughout the world, including The Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo; Art Institute of Chicago; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Los Angeles County Museum; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge; Museum Ludwig, Cologne; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Tate Gallery, London; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Currently Showing at  Frank LLoyd Gallery,  Bergamont Station Santa Monica,CA Frank Lloyd Galler,2525 Michigan Avenue, B5B, Santa Monica, CA
90404, tel: 310 264-3866, fax: 310 264-3868

info@franklloyd.com






Dave Lefner at Skidmore Contemporary

5 03 2010

Dave Lefner Has Aways Been In  Love With LA

As a native-born Angeleno, artist Dave Lefner has always had a love for the city around him.  His work reflects a nostalgia for its aging, but unique signage, storefronts, and architecture from all Los Angeles areas,  ranging from the Valley to Hollywood, to his current home of Downtown L.A.

For Dave, the beauty of this metropolis, whether it’s found in the extreme shadows cast from a broken neon sign at midday or maybe the intricate web of powerlines crisscrossed overhead, provides the perfect inspiration for his detailed, very limited-edition, reduction linoleum block prints.  Since earning his degree in Art from the California State University at Northridge, he has made it his main goal to try to document the history of LA through its urban landscape to help in the preservation of this city, especially Downtown’s historical core.  Even in his chosen medium of reduction linocuts, he hopes to further his goal of preservation.  Because of the immediacy of today’s world, the labor-intensive, process-oriented technique of block printing is being lost and forgotten in the face of a digital age.  But for Lefner, the beautiful mystery of this process, as the piece slowly reveals itself with each new color, is worth preserving as much as his subject matter, his city- a ciudad of angels. Skidmore Contemporary Art Gallery


is opening for Dave Lefner tomorrow  – City Blocks

Reduction Linocuts, March 6 – 27, 2010,

Opening Reception -  Saturday March 6, 4-6 pm
Bergamot Station,  2525 Michigan Avenue, B5, Santa Monica, CA 90404
1-310-828-5070





Gana Art New York-Presents Korean Artist

13 02 2010

Solo exhibition of Korean   Artist Ji-Hyun Park in New York

Lit incense sticks burn themselves into smoke and ash. This transformation into the immaterial helps us better grasp Jihyun Park’s Incense Series of works on paper.  Park uses incense sticks to burn thousands of tiny holes onto sheets of rice paper to create a unified image.  Drawing with a flame, Park inverts the technique of Pointillism by puncturing the fragile paper surface with tiny marks, subtracting rather than adding dots of paint and color.Creating by erasing, Park’s images convey a sense of weightlessness, both in appearance and in reality. Several of his newer works are titled according to their exact weight (or lightness) as finished products.  For Park, the process of erasing results in ephemeral organic forms, ranging from abstract cloud formations and billowing trees to stars in the sky, aptly seared with a thousand points of light. Deeply influenced by the legendary island of Laputa in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels (1726), Park’s images reveal his abiding fascination with Utopia.  Indeed, “incense” or Hyang in Korean puns with “Utopia” in Korean translated as Yi Sang Hyang.  The linguistic interweaving of incense and utopia is hospitable to Park’s idealized visions of nature, life, and transformation created through a unique medium, at once fragrant and incendiary. For Park, idealized places and objects are accompanied by precise emotions.  One of his works titled “Twenty-third” is an imaginary locale, a street he was led to in a subconscious reverie.  Utopia is for Park an extension of his subconscious, where the act of creating by destroying somehow results in the substance of a magical presence. In his exploration of both traditional and contemporary cultures, Park often falls back on his childhood memories in Korea.  In a nod to traditional Eastern ink brush paintings, Park applies black gouache to rice paper and mounts the finished works onto traditional-style scrolls.  The collision of the old and the new sparks Jihyun Park’s quest to capture Utopia within an ever-changing, never-tangible cultural and ideological terrain.

About Gana Art
Since 1983, Gana Art Gallery has been a pioneer in the rapidly developing art market in Korea. Gana has established an international presence as a result of its efforts to promote Korean art internationally. Gana is a major cultural institution in Korea and is well known for its exhibitions and art related activities including the launching of the Gana Art Center in Seoul in 1998. Gana Art Gallery currently supports several artist-in-residency programs in Korea and abroad. Gana opened its first international branch, the Galerie Gana Beaubourg, in Paris in 1995 and opened its Chelsea gallery in the spring of 2008.From its inception, Gana has held firm to its mission of creating a strong presence for Korean artists abroad and for introducing important work from around the world to Korean art enthusiasts. With the rapidly growing global interest in contemporary Asian Art, Gana Art New York is also committed to showcasing talented young and emerging artists from other countries in Asia, including India, China and Japan.

Gana Art:                 568 W 25th Street (between 10th & 11th Avenues)      T: (212)-229-5828       www.ganaart.com
Opening reception:    Feburary 18, 2010: 6 – 8 PM

On view from February 18 -March 20, 2010





Joe Goody at GreenfieldSacks Gallery

5 02 2010

Golden Dreams

Exhibition  is  through March 6, 2010 at Greenfield Sacks Gallery, Bergamont Station, Santa Monica.2525 Michigan Ave, B6. 310.264.0640 A remarkably unique image attracted my attention from the invitation. Who exactly is Joe Goode?

Joe Goode (born 1937) born Joseph Goode, is an American Artist. Goode was born in Oklahoma City, OK, and from 1959 to 1961 attended the Chouinard Art Institute in Los Angeles, CA.

Birth of “Pop Art” - Famous for his “Pop Art” milk bottle paintings and cloud imagery, Goode’s first solo show was in San Francisco at James Newman’s Dilexi Gallery in 1962. In the same year his work was included, along with Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, Jim Dine, Phillip Hefferton, Robert Dowd, Edward Ruscha, and Wayne Thiebaud, in the historically important and ground-breaking New Painting of Common Objects, curated by Walter Hopps at the Pasadena Art Museum. This historical exhibition is considered one of the first “Pop Art” exhibitions in America. These artists were part of a movement, Pop Art which shocked America and the art world and changed the art world forever.
In 2004, Joe Goode began work on a group of paintings that re-examined his past work. Each oil painting featured a photograph affixed to the face, which represented every major series he had produced to date. Goode then used a gas torch to burn holes in the completed piece, which when hung, cast haunting shadows on the wall beneath. After a year’s work, this body had grown to around 40 pieces. Tragically, these paintings were never shown, as they were destroyed in a fire in Goode’s  studio in May 2005.
From this fire, Goode created 3 new bodies of work. These series marks important changes in Goode artistic process; using the photograph as a means for making larger paintings, and the last time Goode would use oil paint, and the first time, at age 68, he would use acrylic.

The exhibition “Ashes” at DNJ Gallery in Los Angeles, California, is a culmination of these three projects; “Burn Out!” -photographs of Goode’s studio which was destroyed in the fire, “Study for Lost Paintings” –small scale photographic studies of his last series of paintings before the fire, and “Lost Paintings” -large scale reproductions of his studies topped with layers of paint.
Over the years, Joe Goode has combined various traditional and non-traditional media in the creation of his artwork. He has explored images which project a way of seeing “in and out” and “up and down” as well as things that can be seen through: milk bottles, oceans, waterfalls, clouds and torn skies. While his subject matter has remained relatively consistent over the years, he has revisited each theme using different media, aiding him in finding unique ways in which he continues to work.
Goode continues to paint, photograph and exhibit. He lives and works in Los Angeles, California. His work is currently on view at the Greenfield Sacks Gallery. 1 310 264.0640.. www.greenfieldsacks.com. A must see!





HERB ALPERT- AT THE ACE GALLERY

3 02 2010

RECEPTION FOR THE ARTIST:  THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2010
7:30-9:00 PM

BLACK TOTEM SERIES RECEPTION FOR THE ARTIST:
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2010, 7:30-9:00 PM. ACE GALLERY BEVERLY HILLS, 9430 WILSHIRE BOULEVARD, BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA 90212
T: 310.858.9090 | F: 310.858.9091
WWW.ACEGALLERY.NET

Totems have pan-cultural associations throughout diverse cultures around the world, and these vertical forms have been used throughout history as tribal talismans representative of the spirit world and genealogies, ancestors and documenting societies. Herb Alpert, in his Black Totem series, has focused on this language of sculpture for the past 20 years and addresses this geneaology in his Black Totem sculptures.Alpert’s process for creating these sculptures is manually intensive. He works with wet clay first, molding it into vertical forms ranging from 8 to 36 inches tall. From these, he selects the ones he will make into larger sculptures that will range from 12 to 20 feet in height. These larger works are also hand formed with the wet clay. When completed, molds are made and then the sculptures are cast in bronze and patinaed black. Alpert’s totems read abstractly yet suggestions of recognizable forms appear; an eagle form seemly emerging from the top of one, or human shapes surfacing. That their forms evolved naturally, organically, and  are formed by the artist without carving tools further convey their biomorphic qualities. Alpert was, for the most part, inspired by the totems unique to the Pacific Northwest of North America such as those of the Haida, Tlingit, Kwakiutl tribes, whose totem poles were made of single pieces of cedar, some up to forty feet in height. For the Haida tribe, these ancestral totems are, and have been for hundreds of years, the essence of family and tribal identity and sometimes were used to mark entranceways to their lodgings, as depiced in the photograph, circa 1880, from Ketchikan, Alaska. The totem poles of the Pacific Northwest function as crests of families or chiefs commemorating major events or occasions, represented by  hierachies of different creatures, animals or various supernatural beings (each signifying different human attributes). In Native American tradition, a totem is an entity or symbol that watches over or ‘assists’ a family, clan or tribe. Totemism, derived from the Ojibwe language, refers to that which is kinship-related, and it is also a belief system that is frequently associated with shamanistic religions. Totems act as ‘familiars’ or guides accompanying one through life, both in the physical and spiritual worlds. Alpert’s forest of totems subliminally engage these theories and histories.

Alpert’s attraction to this sculptural form is understandable as it contains an enormous history. The black patina of his totems is evocative of ancient primal forms and the contemporary material belies an ancient prehistory. The pan-cultural consciousness invested into these dark sculptural forms also relate back in time to Egyptian obelisks as much as they evoke the Modernist sculpture of Constantin Brancusi – specifically Brancusi’s Endless Column (1937),  Alberto  Giacometti’s  extended  figures and early Louise Bourgeois sculpture. Alpert’s work shares with Bourgeois’ sculpture an affinity to animistic entities or guardians. Bourgeois’ first major body of sculpture were slender wooden sculptures – reminiscent of pillars or tribal effigies (she travelled to Africa in the late 1940s), which later developed into totemic constructions – a fusion of architecture with the body, its substitution for the body, or phallic surrogates. Alpert’s biomorphic totems are composed within the gallery space in a forest-like environment, yet while each is singular, they gain intensity as a group, amplified with Alpert’s use of black for the totems.Totemism was also a key element of study in the development of 19th and early 20th century theories of religions, especially for philosophers such as Émile Durkheim, who concentrated his studies on indigenous societies. Drawing on the identification of social groups with spiritual totems in Australian aboriginal tribes, Durkheim theorized how human religious expression was intrinsically founded in the relationship to a group. Sigmund Freud’s Totem and Taboo first published in 1913, employed the application of psychoanalysis to the fields of archaeology, anthropology, and the study of religion. Given a revisionist post-Colonial perception of tribal and indigenous cultures these perspectives now seem curiously Eurocentric. Author Edward Saïd’s Orientalism has been one of the most influential texts reddressing Eurocentric perspectives which has further generated a globalized dialectic. The structural anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss posited in his text Le Totémisme aujourd’hui (Totemism Today), that totems are chosen arbitrarily for the purpose of making the physical world a comprehensive and coherent classificatory system, but also recognized that the concept of totemism is an artifact of western thinking imposed by anthropology.

For Alpert, these towering spires are like frozen smoke, or akin to the ineffable notes of music captured and held still as interminable forms. These abstract, yet formal structures and their process of creation are fluid in a way that jazz is, making intangible compositions physical. Alpert who is also a musician and composer, would not deny that there is a focused fluidity in the making of these sculptures consistent with the intuitive, harmonious and spontaneous moves and swings embodied in his approach to his music.

There will be a forthcoming publication on Herb Alpert’s Black Totems by Hunter Drohojowska-Philp to be published in Spring 2010, distributed by D.A.P.

For further information and visuals please contact Jennifer Kellen
Ace Gallery Beverly Hills
310.858.9090 or email jenniferkellen@acegallery.net





GEBERT GALLERY at the LA ART Show

30 01 2010

GEBERT GALLERY – Interview

The goal of my visit of the LA Art show was very specific – to find exciting Art! And I was generously rewarded for my effort. The first gallery that attracted my attention was The Gebert booth. The Dirk De Bruycker canvas was all too vibrant to be ignored, so I stopped. I spoke to Sandro Gebert, who was kind enough to answer a couple of my questions.

Q: How do you find the new location of the Art Fair– at the LA Convention Center, compared to the Santa Monica’s location?
Sandro Gebert:
It is much better for us, exhibitors. No water leaks from the ceilings, more secure, spacious. This location is a natural step in the growth of the Los Angeles Art market.
Q. In brief – what is the state of the matter of the Art Contemporary market?
Sandro Gebert:
The last one and a half years have been very difficult. However – we are on our way to a recovery. There is a big uptick in the interest in contemporary art. Usually December & January are slow – but the rest of the year we see great sales. We are very optimistic!
Q: Which of the Artists you represent is sought after the most by collectors?
Sandro Gebert: Dirk Bruycker and Judith Kindler.

About Gebert Gallery
Gebert Gallery, in the heart of Venice, is the newest in a long line of family owned and run contemporary art galleries. Gebert Gallery specializes in contemporary abstract painting and sculpture from an international group of artists.

Chiaroscuro Gallery was the first gallery opened by the Gebert family back in 2000. The family has since opened two more galleries in Santa Fe, NM, and one in Scottsdale, AZ. They were renamed Gebert Contemporary in early 2007. Sandro Gebert, long time resident of Venice, was compelled to bring his family’s business to this culturally rich neighborhood in Los Angeles. He saw an opportunity to expose not only established artists, but also emerging artists, to a new audience. For Sandro, Abbot Kinney was a natural choice to open the family’s first gallery in California.www.GebertGallery.com
Geber Gallery affiliates: * Gebert Contemporary Art in Scottsdale, AZ www.GebertArtAZ.com * Gebert Contemporary in Santa Fe www.GebertContemporary.com * Chiaroscuro Gallery in Santa Fe www.ChiaroscuroSantaFe.com

1345 Abbot Kinney Boulevard, Venice, California 90291 | 310.450.9897. Some of the Artists at Gebert Gallery: Tracey Adams, Dirk De Bruycker, Paul Ecke, Betty Gold, Bernd Haussmann, Judith Kindler, John Randall Nelson, Brandon Reese, Barbara Rogers, Lee Silton, Hunt Slonem, Vera Sprunt, Paul Ecke, Betty Gold, Bernd Haussmann, Judith Kindler, Udo Nöger, Brandon Reese, Barbara Rogers, Mark Vinci





Francoise Nielly

25 01 2010

A formidable talent!

During the  15th annual LAART Show, there was one Artist that struck me with her work – Francoise Nielly. I approached to the booth of Villa Del Arte Gallery, Barcellona – and I simply gasped! The power of the stroke and color – the overall images were mesmerizing! She is from France, and is also a Graphic Artist,  a Photographer, an Illustrator, and Animator. She gets her sense of proportion and   her father, who was an Architect.  Growing in the South of France,  she was never too far from the light – hence the vibrant and radiant color palette in her work.  Francois Nielly’s work  is expressive – exhibiting brute force. Oils and knife  combine to sculpt her images. Her work is a pure force of nature.  __________________READ ON






Herb Alpert At THE ACE GALLERY

22 01 2010

Herb Alpert Black Totem Series

I presume you already know who herb Alpert is.A Musical genius,turned sculptor – the eight-time Grammy winner musician Herb Alpert is having a brand new sculpture  installation at The Ace Gallery in Los Angeles. It will be open to the public on February 5,2010. Totems have pan-cultural associations throughout diverse cultures around the world, and these vertical forms have been used over the course of history as tribal talismans representative of genealogies, ancestors and documenting societies. Herb Alpert, in his Black Totem series, has focused on this totemic language of sculpture for the past 20 years.
Alpert’s process for creating these sculptures is very hands on. He works with wet clay first molding it into vertical forms ranging from 8 to 36 inches tall. From these he. . . .____________________READ ON.





THE ACE GALLERY’S Current Exhibit

22 01 2010

JOHN MILLEI Maritime – Paintings

THE ACE GALLERY - JOHN MILLEI  THROUGH FEBRUARY 2010 @ The Wilshire Tower, 5514 Wilshire Blvd.,Los Angeles, CA 90036
THE ACE GALLERY, BEVERLY HILLS T: 323.935.4411 F: 323.202.1082








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