SCULPTING AN ICONIC FIGURE

26 07 2015

ALI MCGRAW

Once in a while – I will post about my own work.  . A lot of art  events have happened  for the past few months and  have hoped that you have relied upon the rest of the media for these updates. This is my latest work. Much to write – I don’t Tsvetana Yvanova - ICON 1--Bronze -18.5 x7.5 x11intend. Just about the completion of this 18.5″ tall life-size portrait of a young Ali McGraw ( Love Story) . She was a 70’s icon and all who were teens at that time will certainly rememberAli Film Picture her iconic  features. The dark eyes, deep and passionate and intelligent. A kind of rare  innocence , that stems out of strength. Something we all identified with… This entire
complexity of her character are written on her face.  Cast in bronze, finished in hot patina and sealed in wax, this portrait is 18.5 inches tall and stands on a black marble  pedestal.

I have aimed to portray this memorable face. And retain the curiosity and innocence of young Ali. And I believe the gal has been achieved.

Yours truly,
TY SUNSHINE

 

 

 

Tsvetana for ArtChronicle

 

 





LONDON-CASS FOUNDATION SCULPTURE PLANS 2012

21 10 2010

LONDON. Exhibition Road, home to the South Kensington museums, is to be lined with ten new and recent sculptures by UK artist Tony Cragg during the 2012 summer Paralympic Games.

The scheme to take over the pedestrianised thoroughfare is led by the Cass Sculpture Foundation, a charitable trust that commissions and sells monumental work on display at its 26-acre estate at Goodwood, near Brighton.
“As a partner of the Cultural Olympiad, we have been working on the Exhibition Road project for the past two years with the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea,” says entrepreneur and philanthropist Wilfred Cass, who established the foundation in 1992. ( Right, Photo of Tony Cragg, Sculptor-www.tony-cragg.com. View a video of on Cragg’s work, click here.)

In another significant move, culture minister Ed Vaizey has expressed interest in the unique funding model of the foundation. Ahead of the 20 October comprehensive spending review, the politician was no doubt keen to discover how the organisation has survived without receiving any funding from state-backed bodies such as Arts Council England.
“The charity’s simple business model effectively means that no outside funding is necessary,” says Cass. “The overheads of the foundation are paid for in full by admission charges and events.” Ed Wilde, technical director at the foundation, says: “When a piece by a particular artist is sold, we will commission another work from them using the foundation’s half of the proceeds. This effectively means that the artists will benefit from 100% of the net profit of a sale, even though the contractual fee is 50/50.”

The sculpture park attracts about 18,000 visitors a year, who pay £10 each to enter. Major sales recently have been to foreign collectors such as Portuguese billionaire José Berardo.

“People find it difficult to understand that a charity can also be commercial but isn’t this the kind of scheme favoured by the current government? With institutions such as the arts council and museums throughout the country facing major cuts, we see our role as working more closely with these bodies,” adds Cass.

 

 

 

VITAL FACTS ABOUT THE CASS SCULPTURE FOUNDATION

The Cass Sculpture Foundation has won a broad international reputation by carefully honing its expertise in the commissioning and sale of large-scale sculpture from the finest British artists.

Profits from all sales are split equally between the artist and the foundation to date we have displayed over 440 new sculptures and have provided an internationally renowned platform for a significant number of British sculptors.
We are now extending our visibility and international profile by planning a major series of events outside of Goodwood.

 

 

Tsvetana Yvanova

Editor,The Art Chronicle





LONDON-FRIEZE ART FAIR BRIEF REPORT

21 10 2010

Big bold art –  sober prices

By Georgina Adam, Charlotte Burns and Melanie Gerlis

LONDON. Dealers were delighted to see hedge-fund honcho Steven Cohen, one of the world’s biggest art buyers, at the preview of Frieze yesterday morning. “It’s my first visit to the fair,” Cohen said as he viewed the work accompanied by his adviser, Sandy Heller.

But Cohen wasn’t the first in. At the front of the line were Dallas collectors Christen and Derek Wilson. “This is my favourite fair,” said Christen, a member of Tate’s North American acquisitions committee. British collectors Frank and Cheryl Cohen sauntered past Tate supremo Sir Nicholas Serota, who was deep in conversation with über-collector Charles Saatchi outside Sadie Coles HQ (C15). Adding serious glamour, Russian collector Dasha Zhukova swished towards Marian Goodman (F16), while supermodel Claudia Schiffer eyed up Thanksgiving 1985 (Table) by hot US artist Roe Ethridge at Andrew Kreps (A7).

Fellow stars included rock’n’roller Keith Richards, photographer David Bailey and an assortment of artists: Ai Weiwei, a wheelchair-bound Tracey Emin, Gavin Turk and Mike Nelson. Early-bird collectors also included Chicago’s Stefan Edlis with Gail Leeson, Hong Kong’s Richard Chang and Brazil’s Ricard Akagawa.

Greeting them were dealers on stands that boasted bigger and bolder displays than in the last two downturn years. Not to be outdone by the usual powerhouses of Gagosian (D8), White Cube (F15), Hauser & Wirth (C12) et al, most galleries this year are ratcheting up their ambitions with larger pieces.
So why is big back? Dealers claim they aren’t driving the trend: “It’s not my ego,” said New York gallerist Friedrich Petzel (D3). “Artists are producing bigger works.” His sales included a large-scale John Stezaker—Untitled (Veil Tiger), 1982—for around £50,000 to a European buyer.

“There are a lot of ambitious collectors still out there,” says James Lindon, visiting the fair from New York’s Pace. He added: “Dealers might be slimming down in terms of production, but that doesn’t impact scale.” In line with today’s more sober mood, many of the materials used are humble: cardboard, paper, flags or found objects.

READ ON …….

 

Tsvetana Yvanova,The Art Chronicle