28 10 2015


During my visit on Saturday October 24th, I have to admit – the most elegant and full experience of Art was at Laura Korman Gallery. The ambiance of the reception was superbly eclectic, and engaging with classical sounds of a harp. The gallery was carefully curated and brimming with vivacious color in Katherine Tsu-Mann’s work on paper. They were complex yet very engaging. Her work has an impact for the end of the room – and when you come close – you are equally engaged in the detail…. It s a wow kind of work. KatherIne Tsu Mann – ARTIST STATEMENT: Mann’s paintings show how patterned, highly-wrought, decorative elements coalesce from the chaos and contingency of an organic environment–and how they dissolve into that environment once again. The artist begins each piece with a stain of color, IMG_1450the product of chance evaporation of ink and water from the paper as it lies on the floor of the studio. From this shape, she nourishes the landscape of each painting, coaxing from this organic foundation the development of
diverse, decorative forms: braids of hair, details from Beijing opera costuming, lattice-work, sequined patterns. Although founded in adornment, these elements are repeated until they too appear organic and highlight the underlying ink-stained foundation. Each piece is tense with the threat of disunity and incoherence as nature and artifice spring from and merge into one another, and as different elements multiply and expand like poisonous growths. Mann’s paintings are utter hybrids; man-sized fields punctuated by moments of absurdity, poetry, mutation, growth and decay that are both suffocating IMG_1453and fabulous. They glory in the sensuous and the rambling, but intersperse the chaos with moments of neurotic control. They explore the potentialities of growth, but also of overabundance. Mann thinks of her work as “Baroque Abstract”: a celebration of the abundance of connections and clashes that can be found in the disparate mess of matter in the world”
In the gallery;s own words, the gallery mission, Laura Korman Gallery “offers a mindful approach to participating within the international and local art markets, showcasing the work of contemporary artists. The works of art encourage viewers to connect deeply with the universality of the human experience. Laura Korman Gallery actively supports a welcoming environment for arts in the Los Angeles community, providing a space for new perspectives and a timely release for all to share.”
This gallery’s artist roster highlights the works of emerging and mid-career artists with a keen eye for the pulse of contemporary society. Whether through vibrant color, social commentary, or innovative structural techniques, these artists offer thought-provoking imagery across a variety of media.
Laura Korman is a Los Angeles native whose relationship with the arts is a family tradition. For her father, comedy veteran Harvey Korman, creativity was a way of life. And after growing up immersed in the talents of Hollywood, his daughter forged her own artistic path. Korman received her B.A. from Scripps College in Psychology and Italian, and earned her M.A. from New York University in Childhood Education and Special Education. By combining her interests in education and art, she built a career in arts administration, sales, and marketing as a Gallery Director at TAG Gallery for three years, before beginning a gallery of her own. Korman is active in the Santa Monica community, serving on the Santa Monica Junior Chamber of Commerce (Jaycees) as a board member and is also a steering committee member of the Bergamot Station Gallery Cultural Association (BSGCA)

It has been a true and rewarding surprise!

Your tuly.






Tsvetana for Art Chronicle


26 10 2015


On October 24th 2015, the Bergamont Station  gallery row is buzzing with life!… It was packed! Parking was full! There were so many events simultaneously that it was barely possible to visit them all,


Craig Krull Gallery, Ned Evans Oct 24, 2015

I was very enthusiastic to see what is in show – some of the invitations were  informative I was actually looking to an Art Talk at Samuel Freeman Gallery , just to find out that they have moved and I simply have forgotten… Ugh.


Andrew Weiss Gallery Oct 24 2015, Photo: ArtChronicle

But there were many new galleries in the place of the ones that have moved elsewhere . Attending the openings was very exciting for me! Especially this Saturday , the Gallery Row seemed to be brimming with life! I went with a friend of mine, who is a couture designer –  and we did a series of gallery  openings. Some – in and out – others kept me in to savor the Artists work. Some of them shows  were great – others outstanding…
One thing   didn’t make me happy – the SANTA MONICA MUSEUM OF ART has closed its doors….. This was a sad moment – but I am sure it will be resolved in matter of  months. I have been there a few times – and ever since it opened – it looked more like a gallery. Perhaps because my idea of an Art Museum as institutions like MOCA or LACMA or TATE …. Anyway – regardless of what I thought – it was a great start for a future institution. Arts have in disfavor f lately by lawmakers and budgetmakers , cutting art programs from schools –  so any organization that enhances public ‘s interest in  Art  is good. Santa Monica Museum of Art , despite its small size was a plus…It remains to be seen what the fate of this art establishment will be.


Laura Korman Gallery,Artist Katherine Tsu Mann, Oct 24, 2015



The truth is– most of the shows were good, some of the shows were even fantastic ! ANDREW WEISS GALLERY, located in the place of the James Gray gallery had a great opening of small works on paper by Larry Bell and Ed Moses among others. It had the feel of a San Francisco gallery… GREG KRULL GALLERY had works by Ned Evans, RUTH BACHOFNER Gallery was showing Virginia Katz and Audra Weasner, LOIS LAMBERT had Kinetic Art and LAURA KORMAN has Katherine Tsu Lynn Mann. All galleries were curated and staged to perfection this season. .Some of them displaying quite a classy presentation with a performance by classical harpist( Charissa Barger at Laura Korman) . The effort extended past the Art and contributed to an air of a celebrartory feel. Hopefully this will reflect in the sales. Bergamont Station is making a come back!!Public’s interest in Art is making a come back! This is the best news as of lately. Yes! Finally! Thank you LA!

Your truly,







for TheArtChronicle



26 07 2015


Once in a while – I will post about my own work.  . A lot of art  events have happened  for the past few months and  have hoped that you have relied upon the rest of the media for these updates. This is my latest work. Much to write – I don’t Tsvetana Yvanova - ICON 1--Bronze -18.5 x7.5 x11intend. Just about the completion of this 18.5″ tall life-size portrait of a young Ali McGraw ( Love Story) . She was a 70’s icon and all who were teens at that time will certainly rememberAli Film Picture her iconic  features. The dark eyes, deep and passionate and intelligent. A kind of rare  innocence , that stems out of strength. Something we all identified with… This entire
complexity of her character are written on her face.  Cast in bronze, finished in hot patina and sealed in wax, this portrait is 18.5 inches tall and stands on a black marble  pedestal.

I have aimed to portray this memorable face. And retain the curiosity and innocence of young Ali. And I believe the gal has been achieved.

Yours truly,




Tsvetana for ArtChronicle




25 08 2014

At last! It has been quite a few years since I have started planning the publication of this book. Planned as a monograph – with some insights and personal experiences surrounding the creation of each work – along with high quality photography by Kelsey McNeal- this book is long overdue. It marks symbolically my formal entering into the sphere of multidisciplinary blend of contemporary public art and  landscape, art and architecture. The book is a crowning completion of a decade devoted to figurative sculpture, portraiture and large scale abstract painting. The format is large – 11 by 11 inches, hardcover with a dust jacket. It is the first of a possible series published by The ArtChronicle. A few other California Artists/Sculptors are already been selected for this art book  series.
BOOK CARDS WHITE newPublishing is planned by high quality printing company MIRA Publishing  in in Missouri. As soon as the final touches are added – and the newest sculpture titled ICON is finished and photographed – it is ready! Indiegogo campaign is in storeandthe rewards are THREE Sample PAGES -amazing in their value! Please stay tuned for the INDOEGOGO fundraising campaign, which will feature exciting gifts , from signed posters , unique and stylish experiences like tickets for a concert and/or diner for two at well known places in Beverly Hills and similar exclusive locataions to sculptures, especially remastered for the occasion.

Stay tuned! Exciting news ahead!

Tsvetana, for ArtChronicle


17 05 2014


I have discovered Cliff Garten’s work in 2013, during my routine research about Harvard graduates of the Graduate School of Design. I was very inspired by what I saw – the scope of his work , the depth, the scale and the playful creativity, all while encompassing large projects with infrasctucture connotation. I was attracted and inspired by the Bullet & Suspect” composition imagery. Despite the harshness of the theme –since the project is a Forensic lab in Denver – and the hard durable materials – the poetry of the composition is undeniable. This is very similar to the well balanced wave design of the Los Angeles Overpass – the Baldwin Cliff Garten Bullet&Suspect Pic2Hills gateway, strongly reminiscent of e lace ribbon. There is a continuity in Cliff Garten’s work – that is rooted in his inner equilibrium. I was inspired by this giant visionary, who breaks boundaries and makes a statement – with harmony and without antagonizing the environment and the public.

Cliff Garten’s clear interest and in the connection between the Public and Private realm as it relates to Art , has always been close to my heart. Mr.Garten artistically embodies my inner belief system in that field. It is not incidental that my own artistic expression covers a wide range of medium, that can only be categorized as “multimedia “. That multidisciplinary quality was another one of Cliff Garden, that I deeply relate to. Somehow through the years – I always believed that Art and Architecture are closely related and the tangent is called Landscape Architecture.

CLIFF GARTEN STUDIO | Philosophy | Purpose
There is a latent potential in every public place and situation to become more than the specific functions it appears to perform. Public and private experiences are never distinct, but exchange places throughout the +Cliff Garten - Studio BLWH E-May2014day. My search for a place where desire intersects with our everyday activity is the search for sculptural forms which engage us in the poetry of our own actions and define our personal and social histories. The necessary facts of our public infrastructure are cause for the possibility of a public expression through the conscious design and integration of art. Sculpture defines our interaction and movement by creating energy between things, generating interest in public activity, reframing our private lives and creating a sense of place within public and private realms” ._C.G

Apparently the Harvard School of Design shares that view, since the graduate Public Art program and the graduate Landscape Architecture program belong to the same school.

On May 12th, 2013, the Los Angeles Arts Commission launched a new program of Open Studio talks with Artists – I was excited to attend to the Cliff Garten’s Open Studio. I was one of approximately twenty attendants. It was a great pleasure to meet Mr.Garten in person – for his level of sophistication, he is an approachable, kind mannered tall man. The presentation was a revelation of his noteworthy projects, his approach and his methodology.
Cliff Garten receptor Pic1There is hardly enough space to point out the details of the presentation- what was clear was that the success of the Studio is lined with depth , dedication and careful planning. Cliff Garten Studio . is a multidisciplinary Art studio for Public Art with the structure, discipline and organization of an Architectural studio, incorporating digital technology along with hands on craft. As Mr.Garten said – “You simply cannot buy a software and become a great designer because of it. The software is a tool – just like the brush and the sculpture rake.” You cannot design something that you are unable to craft with your own hands…” Excellent point. Artists vision for the concept comes first, dictated by the site and or the location – everything else follows, including the digital craft. To say that I agree is an understatement – I share this opinion 100%.
I am very enthusiastic about the rest of the Artists open studio events . Despite the facts that I have attended the most interesting and most inspiring Art talk. Why ? Perhaps because this new form of Art, the so called Public Art is a relatively new phenomenon and is born in the Unites States. And perhaps because it is the only form of Art, that has the capacity to transform the infrastructure of the public realm in this beautiful vast country of ours. Because America might be beautiful – when it comes to nature – but with the demographic +CliffGartenPhoto +Prsentingexpansion comes building an construction expansion that takes over and it is very easy to turn a green field into a concrete desert.

Cliff Garten’s vision has made vast breakthroughs in that regard – by showing that Public Infrastructure can be harmonious and functional at the same time. It is what people call beautiful. I call it simply brilliant.
If there is any slippery slope between Art and Function – it was not present in Cliff’s Garten’s work. When it comes to Public Art – Form and Function is allowed as long as it does carry artistic vision of a genius like Cliff Garten to unite the two in a interplay that brings subtle , yet unforgettable experiences.

Yours Truly,

IMG_0016Public Art Lover,
Tsvetana Yvanova

for the ArtChronicle




31 01 2013


The LA Art Show was much expected by Artists and Collectors and Art lovers just the same. It was here and it is gone Iphone 420now. I was able to attend for a brief Saturday afternoon – and it was packed! I thought I was in some kind of futuristic Art version of Neiman Marcus … Not that Neiman was ever that packed with visitors. That was the curious part – apparently, the organizers did a wonderful job promoting it.

Most impressive part was the variety of Art and the presence of Chinese Artists and GalleriesLA ART (27). Among the American Galleries, who are always present at every show like ABBY TAYLOR GALLERY (Boston) and LUREI GALLERY (Los Angeles) just to name a couple – the presence of Chinese art galleries was strong both as number of galleries and quality of Art. The Chinese traditional mastery was possibly the most impressive – A wonderdful large-scale portrait of an elderly lady stayed with me long after I left the show. Daniele Sculpture Woman with w cigaretteImpeccable brushstroke – and emotion for detail. For the short time I was able to view the show  – one other thing made an impression on me – very little sculpture. Almost nonexistent. Could it be that this means a Sculpture Art Show is in the making for 2014?  Hmmm – Maybe next ART SHOW  will have a special section exclusively for sculpture – Contemporary and Traditional Figurative…. In any case – LURIE GALLERY had two California Artists, both dramatically different in their sculpture technique – Jon Krawzhyk contemporary abstract medium, usually  large scale and Daniele Matalon – traditional figurative third to half-life size bronzes. Daniele Matalon’s “Petra” is exquisite, sensual in a contained kind of way, and masterful in its execution. Daniele Matalon is a Sculptor, who started her career in early 2000. ‘Petra’ reminds me of a sculptural version of an Var5gas and Olivia’s glamourous pin-ups. To view the show , for you is a brief video on the Art Chronicle YOUTUBE  channel ( click on the red text to activate the link).  See you soon!

 Yours Truly,





Tsvetana Yvanova,

for The Art Chronicle


9 06 2012


A few months ago I came across a handwritten note by a very good artist, in his eighties – who just happens to like  classical representational art. He not only did not like abstract painting – he disliked it. OK – many people do not like abstractions – but they have the wisdom to say -‘ I don’t understand it’. What is the Artist trying to say?  That is a valid point. You must understand something before you appreciate it or pass an opinion. I personally struggled for a long time because I did not understand Christo. However –  after a few  videos, his  biographical book, and a few other books on his art – I came upon the ‘aha’ moment. I got it! And ever since  that moment a few years back –  I am trying to the best of my abilities to explain  his art to others – to the best of my understanding.  Back to  the old school Artist, who dislikes Abstract art.  So much so, that he had the audacity to cut out an Article form a newspaper, about a celebrated abstract artist Helen Frankenthaler, with a note  addressed to his fellow-artist buddy:  ‘ Hi  John! Here is another example of hoe talentless fraud is accepted as art  and equally kook-y critics!'”. I just happen to know ‘John’,  who knows I love abstract art and just lets me have the  cut outs… The point here is – it is so easy to  dismiss something one does not understand. And  for some – belittling and degrading something they simply cannot   grasp – comes even easier.

But WHY?

Why dismiss something that clearly has values to many – aesthetic value, poetic value,  even monetary value ….. That brings me to  enclosing some reprints from a a well known publication about my favorite  abstract artist – Gerhard Richter – named lately ” The Top Selling Living artist“:  by Wall Street Journal in an  article by Kelly Crow.

About Gerhard Richter’s unrivalled success Mr. Crow adds: “The artist’s ascent is being driven by market demands as much as curatorial merit: Auction houses and museums, eager for new masters to canonize, are showcasing Mr. Richter’s works around the world at an ever-increasing clip. An influx of international collectors and dealers are also seizing the moment to buy or sell his pieces at a profit—including art-world tastemakers such as Russian industrialist Roman Abramovich, French luxury-goods executive Bernard Arnault, dealer Larry Gagosian, Taiwanese ele
ctronics mogul Pierre Chen and New York hedge-fund manager Steven Cohen

Mr. Richter’s work is uniquely suited to the tastes of the current art market. Like Picasso, he paints in a number of different styles—from rainbow-hued abstracts to poignant family portraits—giving collectors plenty of choice. Like Warhol, he is prolific, which ensures a steady volume of his works in the marketplace—yet enough of his works are in museum collections that he has avoided a glut. And ever since the deaths last year of painters Cy Twombly and Lucian Freud, collectors searching for another senior statesman have started giving his work a closer look.

Collectors are paying a particular premium for Mr. Richter’s larger abstracts from the
late 1980s, which have all the visual impact of a work by Francis Bacon or Mr. Rothko, artists whose prices spiked before the recession. These abstracts are also immediately identifiable as being Mr. Richter’s creations, making them easy status symbols. San Francisco dealer Anthony Meier says, “Collectors want an iconic work in a format that everyone recognizes. Monkey see, monkey do”

As Terry Teachout points out in his article “ The Seductive Allure of Abst

raction” :

“Part of what makes this series so fascinating is that Mr. Diebenkorn, who died in 1993, waged a lifelong “battle” with abstraction. He started out as a gifted Abstract Expressionist painter. In 1955 he suddenly embraced representation, turning out dozens of figurative paintings that translate the language of Matisse into a wholly personal, semiabstract style. Then, in the Ocean Park series, he made a decisive return to total abstraction, in the process creating the most original works of his career.

“To chart Mr. Diebenkorn’s stylistic development is to be reminded of the near-overwhelming power of the idea of abstraction in the 20th century. It was even felt by artists who, like Pierre Bonnard and Fairfield Porter, never produced an abstract painting in their lives, but were nonetheless influenced by the way in which practitioners of abstraction created what Mr. Diebenkorn called “invented landscapes,” nonobjective images that evoked the world of tangible reality while steering clear of literal representation.”

“Just as Kandinsky turned his back on figuration, so did the atonal composers of the early 20th century, led by Arnold Schoenberg, abandon tonal harmony, the fundamental ordering principle on which all Western classical music had previously been based. In a tonal composition, harmonic movement is the “plot” that propels the listener through time. Schoenberg, by contrast, sought to express his inmost feelings in a raw, unmediated way instead of using large-scale tonal architecture to shape them into conventionally coherent structures. “One must express oneself! he told Kandinsky in 1911.Express oneself directly! Not one’s taste, or one’s upbringing, or one’s intelligence, knowledge or skill. Not all these acquired characteristics, but that which is inborn, instinctive.”

Whatever causes the Abstract Art to  be in the center of such controversies as despised by some and revered by others  – is certainly not going away. Abstract Art  is here to stay. For those of us – who love Abstract Art – and even paint abstract – this is the good news. For the ones, who have not grown to at least like it – I would say – “Get over it!  Spend more time trying to understand it and less time complaining and maybe you will figure out why abstract art is so timeless…’ For now, my Abstract lovers – let us enjoy Richter’s unlimited imagination, while he keeps being amazed at his  own success….

Yours truly,


 Tsvetana Yvanova

 for The Art Chronicle


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