Kristan Marvel Bronzes at Warner Center

20 07 2011

THE ART ART PROJECT with Curator Jeff Phillips

is presenting Kristan Marvel in  CONTEMPORARY BRONZE  show.

“CONTEMPORARY BRONZE”
July 15, 2011 – September 15, 2011
marvellpiece.jpg

Kristan Marvell
Opening Reception
July 30th, 2011   5-8pm

SCULPTURE @ THE PLAZA GARDENS

WARNER CENTER
21st Century Plaza
6301 Owensmouth Ave
Woodland Hills, CA 91367

THE ART OF KRISTAN MARVELL

Kristan Marvel’ s sculptures derive from a technique, which he developed and has worked with over the last twenty years, that he calls spontaneous carving. His  bronze sculptures begin as monolithic chunks of Styrofoam. As a stone carver has marble, Marvell has Styrofoam. The sculptures evolve as Marvell pulls and  manipulates large hot wires through massive blocks of Styrofoam. This process   allows for the improvisational removal of material and produces a unique visual    vocabulary. Also, Styrofoam, a material devoid of sensuality, an industrial    emblem, is in a sense corrected and made sensual as it progresses towards its  transformation into bronze.
Through this visual vocabulary Marvell explores the confrontation between the  natural, the organic, and man’s manipulation and reconstruction of the world.
On the most obvious level, the natural landscape is used as a point of inspiration, a visual ode to the raw power of its geological beauty. The work acknowledges and utilizes nature’s ability to elicit emotional transcendence. However, the sculptures are not replicas of natural formations. As a sculptor, Marvell, is interested in thematic or formalist concepts such as the relationship between mass and density, or volume and spatial balance. He likes the enigma of creating sculptures where mass is levitated in unusual ways, where unwary fragility is able to bear great weight. By way of modernist formal concerns the work references the concept of man’s transformation of nature through the intellectual event of manipulation.
As the eye wanders the sculptural planes, there is a sparseness, a focused control of surface and texture, in which the hand of the artist is evident. In that organization of space, a thoughtful and heart felt integrity emerges, imbuing the sculptures with emotion and grace, reaffirming the power of the object.

by Nicholette Kominos

For  The Art Chronicle





LONDON-CASS FOUNDATION SCULPTURE PLANS 2012

21 10 2010

LONDON. Exhibition Road, home to the South Kensington museums, is to be lined with ten new and recent sculptures by UK artist Tony Cragg during the 2012 summer Paralympic Games.

The scheme to take over the pedestrianised thoroughfare is led by the Cass Sculpture Foundation, a charitable trust that commissions and sells monumental work on display at its 26-acre estate at Goodwood, near Brighton.
“As a partner of the Cultural Olympiad, we have been working on the Exhibition Road project for the past two years with the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea,” says entrepreneur and philanthropist Wilfred Cass, who established the foundation in 1992. ( Right, Photo of Tony Cragg, Sculptor-www.tony-cragg.com. View a video of on Cragg’s work, click here.)

In another significant move, culture minister Ed Vaizey has expressed interest in the unique funding model of the foundation. Ahead of the 20 October comprehensive spending review, the politician was no doubt keen to discover how the organisation has survived without receiving any funding from state-backed bodies such as Arts Council England.
“The charity’s simple business model effectively means that no outside funding is necessary,” says Cass. “The overheads of the foundation are paid for in full by admission charges and events.” Ed Wilde, technical director at the foundation, says: “When a piece by a particular artist is sold, we will commission another work from them using the foundation’s half of the proceeds. This effectively means that the artists will benefit from 100% of the net profit of a sale, even though the contractual fee is 50/50.”

The sculpture park attracts about 18,000 visitors a year, who pay £10 each to enter. Major sales recently have been to foreign collectors such as Portuguese billionaire José Berardo.

“People find it difficult to understand that a charity can also be commercial but isn’t this the kind of scheme favoured by the current government? With institutions such as the arts council and museums throughout the country facing major cuts, we see our role as working more closely with these bodies,” adds Cass.

 

 

 

VITAL FACTS ABOUT THE CASS SCULPTURE FOUNDATION

The Cass Sculpture Foundation has won a broad international reputation by carefully honing its expertise in the commissioning and sale of large-scale sculpture from the finest British artists.

Profits from all sales are split equally between the artist and the foundation to date we have displayed over 440 new sculptures and have provided an internationally renowned platform for a significant number of British sculptors.
We are now extending our visibility and international profile by planning a major series of events outside of Goodwood.

 

 

Tsvetana Yvanova

Editor,The Art Chronicle





LONDON-FRIEZE ART FAIR BRIEF REPORT

21 10 2010

Big bold art –  sober prices

By Georgina Adam, Charlotte Burns and Melanie Gerlis

LONDON. Dealers were delighted to see hedge-fund honcho Steven Cohen, one of the world’s biggest art buyers, at the preview of Frieze yesterday morning. “It’s my first visit to the fair,” Cohen said as he viewed the work accompanied by his adviser, Sandy Heller.

But Cohen wasn’t the first in. At the front of the line were Dallas collectors Christen and Derek Wilson. “This is my favourite fair,” said Christen, a member of Tate’s North American acquisitions committee. British collectors Frank and Cheryl Cohen sauntered past Tate supremo Sir Nicholas Serota, who was deep in conversation with über-collector Charles Saatchi outside Sadie Coles HQ (C15). Adding serious glamour, Russian collector Dasha Zhukova swished towards Marian Goodman (F16), while supermodel Claudia Schiffer eyed up Thanksgiving 1985 (Table) by hot US artist Roe Ethridge at Andrew Kreps (A7).

Fellow stars included rock’n’roller Keith Richards, photographer David Bailey and an assortment of artists: Ai Weiwei, a wheelchair-bound Tracey Emin, Gavin Turk and Mike Nelson. Early-bird collectors also included Chicago’s Stefan Edlis with Gail Leeson, Hong Kong’s Richard Chang and Brazil’s Ricard Akagawa.

Greeting them were dealers on stands that boasted bigger and bolder displays than in the last two downturn years. Not to be outdone by the usual powerhouses of Gagosian (D8), White Cube (F15), Hauser & Wirth (C12) et al, most galleries this year are ratcheting up their ambitions with larger pieces.
So why is big back? Dealers claim they aren’t driving the trend: “It’s not my ego,” said New York gallerist Friedrich Petzel (D3). “Artists are producing bigger works.” His sales included a large-scale John Stezaker—Untitled (Veil Tiger), 1982—for around £50,000 to a European buyer.

“There are a lot of ambitious collectors still out there,” says James Lindon, visiting the fair from New York’s Pace. He added: “Dealers might be slimming down in terms of production, but that doesn’t impact scale.” In line with today’s more sober mood, many of the materials used are humble: cardboard, paper, flags or found objects.

READ ON …….

 

Tsvetana Yvanova,The Art Chronicle





BILLY ZANE – The surprise of Bergamont Station

14 09 2010

A Saturday visit to the Bergamont Station galleries was full of surprises. Me and a good friend, made an appearance on all  of the openings that night. The excitement, the buzz was there. Sometimes when expectations are high – impressions are  almost always slightly below. We were zigzagging from gallery to gallery faster than Mao Tse Dung breezed through Versailles . . . .Unril, I discovered Billy Zane exhibit at Laurie Frank Gallery ( Frank Pictures Gallery ). It lacked the hip and stylish arrogance of its neighbors – but it compensated in wonderfully curated Billy Zane show, well under its way. I was surprised both by the name as well as by the quality of his work. Robert Rauschenberg comes to mind. Obviously, Billy Zane’s talents have little boundaries. His work displayed controlled spontaneity and artistic confidence.

Below is their promo for the show.

Frank Pictures Gallery is delighted to present, Killing With Love. Billy Zane’s first show of paintings with an opening reception for the artist. Zane, best known for his achievements as an actor in over 80 films, most memorably as Caledon Hockley in the 1997 film Titanic, began painting during his seven months of filming the blockbuster with James Cameron. It didn’t take long for his interest in painting become more than a pastime, it became a consuming passion, often interrupted by his on set responsibilities. Since then he has set

Frances Fisher, Billy Zane & Friend

up makeshift art studios on almost every location he is filming in, the cultural influences and limitation to local materials influencing his spontaneous abstract offerings. ‘I love the mystery. The joy of making do with what you have to work with. The Hardware store is my art store and most countries, cities and villages have one in some form or another. If I can’t find canvas, I find old signage, shelf liner, or shipping crates. If I can’t find enough paint I use soil, clay, wine, spit, anything that adheres.”

He has been further influenced in his art by his practice of the Japanese sword fighting martial art Kendo. “In Kendo, or Specifically the Samurai ethic and art of swordsmanship, before it was diluted into a sport after WW2, one should not insult their opponent with a mincing, poorly executed cut It should be decisive, effective, a clean kill, informed with respect for ones adversary and ones own skill. In painting, it’s this commitment to task that interests me most, the cut, the stroke. The act supersedes the message. Logic and meaning, if any, emerges after the fact, but is also inherent, like the sculpture in the stone, and only evident when I have been guided by an almost brash confidence. Painting for me, is more physical than psychological or even emotional. Although, I derive great joy from the act and serve an almost insatiable desire to sling paint.”

That maybe so – but many have had the desire to ‘sling’  paint, few have done it well. And Billy Zane does it very well. The FRANKS PICTURES GALLERY is located on the address below:

Bergamot Station Gallery A-5, 2525 Michigan Avenue, Santa Monica California 90404, Tel. 310-828-0211, Fax. 310-828-0221

Moblie. 323-839-6166 .They  are open Tuesday – Saturday from

11:30 am – 6:30 pm or by appointment. Laurie@FrankPicturesGallery.com

They have a New York affiliate gallery – Johnny Wong.
Johnny@FrankPicturesGallery.com

Yours truly, Tsvetana Yvanova





Meet Jeremy Lipking – A True California Talent

28 03 2010

A Note From Jeremy

Dear Friends,

I hope you are enjoying your winter (or summer for my southern hemisphere friends), I know I am. Here in southern California the Winters and Spring are my favorite times to paint outdoors, the hills are green, the streams are full and the temperatures can be in the 70’s and 80’s. I’ve been trying get out there when I can to take advantage of the great conditions. I’ve also been lucky this Winter to have had a chance to paint with some great visiting artists like Christopher Pugliese and Rose Frantzen who currently has an exhibition at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC.
Here are some upcoming events I’d like you to know about.

California Workshops
May and June
In each of these workshops we’ll be painting the figure in the studio and outdoors. Click on the links to register and pay.

May Workshop:
May 14th, 15th & 16th 2010

June Workshop:
June 25th, 26th & 27th 2010

Location: Agoura Hills CA
Cost: $495.

For people in Southern California I also offer a weekly painting class in my studio on Tuesday nights 7-10pm. The cost for 8-weeks is $480. To register or for more info on this or the 3-day workshops contact Danielle or call 818-451-7675
You may also pay online for the weekly class here.

Realist Revolution: Panel Discussion
Contemporary Art: REALIST REVOLUTION and CRITICAL RELEVANCE, Is Main Stream Media Missing an Important Cultural Trend?
Date: 4:00PM Friday April 23rd 2010
Location: Hyatt Regency Reston, VA (Washington D.C area)
Cost: Free (you must reserve tickets though)
I am really excited to announce this panel discussion I’ll be moderating at the 2010 Art of the Portrait Conference in the Washington D.C area next month. We have a top notch panel that will be discussing the current movement in representational art and its place in the contemporary art world.
Panel members are:
Jacob Collins, artist & founder of Grand Central Academy
Alexey Steele, artist and recipient of 2009 Gusi Peace Prize
James Panero, writer and managing editor of The New Criterion
Dr. Vern Swanson, author and expert on Academic and Realist art & Director of the Springville Museum.
This is an important discussion for any artist or collector. Although it is part of the Art of the Portrait Conference agenda, this one event will be open to anyone at no cost but you must reserve tickets by emailing Christine Egnoski at info@portraitsociety.org or call 877-772-4321

Solo Exhibition NY

And Last but not least my Solo Exhibition I have been working on for two years night is opening Thursday night June 10th. 2010 at Arcadia Gallery,
51 Greene Street
New York, NY 10013
212-965-1387
I hope to see you there.

Sincerely,

Jeremy Lipking

http://www.lipking.com





Larry Bell At FRANK LLOYD GALLERY

5 03 2010

Larry Bell – A  Contemporary Master

Upon visiting  the Frank LLoyd Gallery, at The Bergamont Station in Santa Monica  – Larry Bell’s work attracted me with its impeccable execution – and somber colors. The textures of the collages were unique – with this  fine, yet commercial feel to it. There is beauty in   the primal compositions ,  executed in the finest of techniques. Add to the blend metallic paint and  all shades of  the dark palette – and you get the picture. Two words come to mind – refined mysticism. We are left with our imagination – wondering where is Joan now?

Larry Bell’s work emerged in the mid-1960’s, and is often included in major exhibitions of Minimal art. His work was shown in the first exhibit to focus on Minimal art, “Primary Structures”, at the Jewish Museum in 1966. Bell’s work was also included in the seminal Museum of Modern Art exhibit, “The Responsive Eye” in 1965. More recently, Bell’s work was prominently presented in the Museum of Contemporary Art’s show, “A Minimal Future? Art as Object 1958-1968”, and discussed at length in the catalogue essays.
Bell is one of the most prominent and influential artists to have come out of the Los Angeles art scene of the 1960s, first showing at the Huysman Gallery, and then at Ferus. He became associated with the most important movements at the time, such as Light and Space art and what was described as “Finish Fetish” (a term coined by the late critic John Coplans). Bell has continued to investigate the complexities of highly refined surface treatments of glass, as well as large-scale sculptural installations.

Larry Bell was born in Chicago in 1939, and currently resides in Taos, New Mexico. The artist now maintains studios in Taos, New Mexico and Venice, California. Having grown up in the San Fernando Valley, Bell attended Chouinard Art School in Los Angeles from 1957 through 1959, where he was a student of Robert Irwin. He was extraordinarily successful as a young artist, and showed regularly at Pace Gallery in New York between 1965 and 1973. In September of 2005, Pace Wildenstein presented a show of works titled “Larry Bell: The Sixties”.

His work is in public collections throughout the world, including The Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo; Art Institute of Chicago; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Los Angeles County Museum; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge; Museum Ludwig, Cologne; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Tate Gallery, London; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Currently Showing at  Frank LLoyd Gallery,  Bergamont Station Santa Monica,CA Frank Lloyd Galler,2525 Michigan Avenue, B5B, Santa Monica, CA
90404, tel: 310 264-3866, fax: 310 264-3868

info@franklloyd.com






Dave Lefner at Skidmore Contemporary

5 03 2010

Dave Lefner Has Aways Been In  Love With LA

As a native-born Angeleno, artist Dave Lefner has always had a love for the city around him.  His work reflects a nostalgia for its aging, but unique signage, storefronts, and architecture from all Los Angeles areas,  ranging from the Valley to Hollywood, to his current home of Downtown L.A.

For Dave, the beauty of this metropolis, whether it’s found in the extreme shadows cast from a broken neon sign at midday or maybe the intricate web of powerlines crisscrossed overhead, provides the perfect inspiration for his detailed, very limited-edition, reduction linoleum block prints.  Since earning his degree in Art from the California State University at Northridge, he has made it his main goal to try to document the history of LA through its urban landscape to help in the preservation of this city, especially Downtown’s historical core.  Even in his chosen medium of reduction linocuts, he hopes to further his goal of preservation.  Because of the immediacy of today’s world, the labor-intensive, process-oriented technique of block printing is being lost and forgotten in the face of a digital age.  But for Lefner, the beautiful mystery of this process, as the piece slowly reveals itself with each new color, is worth preserving as much as his subject matter, his city- a ciudad of angels. Skidmore Contemporary Art Gallery


is opening for Dave Lefner tomorrow  – City Blocks

Reduction Linocuts, March 6 – 27, 2010,

Opening Reception –  Saturday March 6, 4-6 pm
Bergamot Station,  2525 Michigan Avenue, B5, Santa Monica, CA 90404
1-310-828-5070